Talking Money – Switch your mortgage to save

This week on ‘Talking Money’ Karl Deeter and Jill Kerby were discussing ‘switching’ with Cormac on RTE’s Drivetime. It was coincidental that many of the points we made were reinforced by the Central Bank findings this week on mortgage switching on points such as assertive customer behaviour being important and not allowing inertia to hold people back.

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Banks have a message for you, ‘Get off my loan book!’

We have been saying for quite some time that banks would start to find ways to induce people away from their loan book. The first mention is from a post here back inn 2008 where we mentioned ‘early redemption bonuses‘  and then we also said something similar which Niall Brady from the Sunday Times picked up on in July of 2009.

The basic premise is that banks want rid of certain types of borrowers and loans in particular, and in some cases loans in general. We’ll take a look at the loans that bother them the most below.

1: Sub-Prime loans: this is definitely the clearing house recently Fresh Mortgages sold their loan book in a private deal believed to be well below 30c on the euro. This was for a book that was secured on sub-prime mortgages and serviced via a centre in Northern Ireland, something Fresh did was to offer their borrowers an inducement to go elsewhere or pay …

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Want bad advice? Pop into your local bank branch.

We felt that this story was worth reproducing in full, it is from today’s Independent, via their award winning Personal Finance editor Charlie Weston. This clearly lays it out in our opinion: getting advice in your local bank branch is perhaps the worst option available, and that puts the value of an independent broker in the light we always aim for, one of being on the customer side, the recent Sunday Times article (three posts before this) demonstrated that in a cost comparison analysis that even the Regulator themselves couldn’t get the prices brokers are able to obtain for their customers! Tuesday December 08 2009

IF you want bad advice, then pop into your local bank branch.

That is the clear message from the latest set of case studies released by Financial Services Ombudsman Joe Meade.

Mr Meade has performed an enormous service for consumers by exposing yet again the shady practices of banks, in particular, when people seek advice.

His report is shot through with examples of consumers, particularly older ones, …

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NAMA pricing, and why we’ll over-pay

The ‘haircuts’ we are hearing about in the papers of late are not ‘bobs’,’mullets’ or ‘short back n’ sides’, it is all about the pricing of NAMA assets, and when the pricing does become public don’t be disappointed to hear that it isn’t as big as many have felt it must be, the taxpayer is going to (ultimately) over-pay for the assets that NAMA takes on, try not to feel ripped off, in fact, overpaying is perhaps the only way we can get NAMA to work and the alternative is worse. I don’t envisage a haircut of any more than 18-20% at most if we are to ensure that banks and Government are truly working towards one aim when it comes to NAMA.

It is vital to remember – any NAMA losses will be levied upon the banks with interest, so even if there are losses (and there has to be, because there is no way anybody could get things 100% right) the tax payer is -in the long term- sheltered. While …

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How falling interest rates hurt banks during a liquidity crisis

The falling interest rates are heralded by consumers of Irish mortgage companies as a godsend – well, for the clients of the Irish banks who actually pass on the full rate cuts that is! However, at the same time it creates a rate compression which damages the bank and this is what we will consider in this article.

Banks have two sides to the operation roughly speaking, on one side there is the lending function which we are all aware of, mortgages, car loans, personal loans etc. on the other side is the deposit taking function which provides part of the money they lend out. There is of course the interbank market which supplements (and often surpasses) deposit funds for lending, but to keep things simple we will focus on a world where deposits roughly equal lending.

When

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Mortgage Application Requirements: What do I need and Why?

The average mortgage taken out in Ireland is approximately €260,000. Before mortgage providers lend-out such large amounts of money they need to be as sure as possible that the funds will be repaid in full and on time over an agreed period. While a home loan is secured on the property as collateral, this should not reduce the lenders’ lending prudence because repossessing a home in the case of non-repayment of a loan is an absolute last resort which takes a lot of time, costs a whole lot of money and risks generating such grossly negative publicity that it is barely worth it and is entirely unattractive. So, to ensure this possible outcome is seldom reached; lenders vet their potential clients carefully using the following key documents on which to base their underwriting decision…

Photo ID Irish Law demands that a financial institution must establish the identity of a client before entering into any financial transaction. Of course, its logical that …

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