TV3 The Morning Show, Personal Finance with Karl Deeter

This is the full clip which incorporates ‘The Insider’ and the follow up piece in studio about how banks can use your information to sell you things. The majority of people open accounts to keep money safe and to make payments, not to be sold products or have their data used to target them for a sales pitch, we talk about the best way to defend yourself from this.

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11 Mortgage tips

Being a first time buyer actively looking to purchase a home is often a daunting situation, often made worse by the unknown. While some people find it a painless process others have personal circumstances or lifestyle habits which stack the odds against them which they are not even aware of.

That is why we have made a list of eleven tips that first time buyer should be aware of prior to applying for a mortgage, because if you only find out about them after you make your application (and in particular if it results in a credit decline) then it could set you back months at least if not years.

1. Be in a permanent job finished probation and ideally working continuously for 2 years: This is a good rule of thumb, an ability to repay is the key consideration with lenders, and the way they determine this by seeing an income history that has a likelihood of continuing. A loan is only underwritten once, at origination, so the lender knows that taking a chance early on means taking a …

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New ‘Consumer Protection Code’, the proposed CPC47 going forward.

The original Consumer Protection Code was brought out in 2006 and it was a welcome augmentation to the Regulatory environment, since the financial crisis began we are increasingly hearing calls for ‘more regulation’.

Naturally, good regulation is of benefit to both industry and consumers alike, perhaps industry is actually the greater beneficiary because faith in the financial system allows funds to flow freely and in turn financial firms can make profits with greater ease albeit at lower margins (increased competition tends to go hand in hand with that environment).

However, Regulation that is there to hog-tie or ‘get back’ at either beneficiary of regulation is flawed, so something that hammers banks or consumers is ultimately not an achievement but a regression, and for that reason I can’t help but feel sceptical about the new Consumer Protection Code which will come about from the briefings laid out in consultation paper 47 (recently closed).

Where are the key areas that the failure arose?

Bank …

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Bank cost of funds versus mortgage prices

Eurodollar or LIBOR cost of funds is a common phrase in banking, what does it mean or do though?

Banks borrow short term and lend out long term, they call it ‘maturity transformation’ and in doing so they aim to make a mark up on the money, it’s the same concept that a shop uses in selling cartons of milk, fundamentally the idea is the same.

The LIBOR rate is ‘London interbank offer rate’ and represents the cost of funds for a high quality non-governmental institutional borrower.

To get an idea of the cost of funds (and this is currently speculative because Irish banks don’t get offered funds at Euribor [euro equivalent of Libor]) all you have to do is a simple calculation.

We know that banks tend to use three month money and that means that any calculation will always have the interest rate reduced by multiplying it by 90/360 (3 months = 90 days, and 360 = 1 year [I know that in real life 1 year is 365 days but that small change of 5 days gives …

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Regulation failure: Independent brokers unable to be ‘independent’

We were thinking of changing the way that brokers operate, by saying to our clients ‘our service comes at a price, we’ll advise you on any lender in the market and be totally independent, if we place your loan with one that pays commission you can set that against your fee, and if not then pay the fee’, doing so in the belief that totally transparent and independent advice is a good thing, and something that everybody wants, the broker, the consumer and the Regulator.

Sadly this is not the case, instead the Regulator (soon due another name change to ‘Central Bank Financial Services Authority of Ireland’) is relying on the letter of the law in the Consumer Credit Act of 1995 to ensure that brokers can’t give best advice. This is an example of total regulatory failure.

The actual portion of the code is S. 116.1.b which states ‘A person shall not engage in the business of being a mortgage intermediary unless— ( a ) he is the holder of an authorisation (“a …

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Moving paper or ‘selling your mortgage’.

In the USA and Canada they sometimes refer to a process of ‘moving paper’ which is where a person sells their mortgage – the actual debt and all the conditions that go with it. That might sound kind of pointless but it would certainly be a valuable option in Ireland and could perhaps offer (if it existed: it doesn’t) a selling advantage of debt holders over non-debt holders in selling a property.

Take an example of a person selling a house for €200,000 if they were able to offer their current mortgage of ECB+1% to the prospective buyer then it might be an attractive proposition! In particular, the bank might benefit because even if the person was in negative equity it might be worthwhile to buy such a debt product at a premium.

People don’t think about buying or selling mortgages (institutions do it all the time), and yet we readily consider buying and selling debt (which is what the bond market is). Why can’t we do the same for the individual …

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5 keys to the market, stock indicators to watch

Todd Harrison of Minyanvill.com talks to Yahoo!’s tech-ticker team about the five signals he sees as being those that fundamentally move the market.

1.Treasury yields: The 10-year yield settled at 3.50% on Friday, down from its recent rise to 3.78% on June 19, but still well above the January lows around 2.7%. Whether traders view this rise as a sign of “normalization” or incipient inflation will help determine the market’s fate, Harrison says.

2.Inflation vs. Deflation: Even Alan Greenspan knows the Fed faces a major challenge of needing to rein in excess liquidity before inflation takes hold, but not too soon as to risk choking off the recovery. Inflation is clearly a long-term threat, but Harrison says there’s 75% odds deflation persists for the near-term. (great piece on this by Morgan Stanley here)

3. New Supply of Stock: UBS’s $3.5 billion stock sale Friday is just the latest in a series of secondary offerings from banks. Some are worried about the pure supply and demand issues, but Harrison is …

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