Proving property tax exemptions

The Irish Revenue Commissioners, a government funded agency, is responsible for  a multitude of financially related activities; some of these include customs, excise, and overall taxation. In 2013, Revenue changed the way that Local Property Tax (LPT) was collected for all residential properties in Ireland. 

This tax is meant to hold the owners of residential or rental properties accountable for the payment of tax on all of their assets. Beyond just these two groups, people who have a lease of twenty years or greater, local authority/social housing organizations, or a person acting as a personal representative for a deceased owner are also responsible for paying the LPT. 

LPT can be charged on homes that are unoccupied or uninhabited, if it is a suitable place to be lived in. If it is not up to par with regular living standards, no LPTs will have to be paid on the property. There is a great deal of opinion that comes into play when deeming a property livable or not, which is why the  Irish Revenue Commissioners requires that some type of documentation …

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Residential property prices rise across Ireland

Within the last 7 years there has been an upward trend for residential property pricing. So far, 2019 has continued to follow this trend, showing significant national growth each month; Dublin seems to stay at or above par in comparison to national average prices.  

Although this trend has been upwards, Ireland is still yet to reach the price levels that they had sustained in 2007. The current residential property prices in Dublin still falls at 22.5% lower than the highest period during the early 2000s, while the national values are 18.5% lower.

In 2018, the prices rose a total of 13.3% throughout the year, giving many sellers hope that the trend would continue forward into the following year. From February to March 2019, the prices increased 3.8%. March to April there was a 3.1% increase, which shows a smaller amount of increase, but it is still far from slowing down.

Dublin increased residential prices by 0.5%, leaving house prices and apartment rents increasing by the same 2.2% as the previous month.

It seems that Dublin and …

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First time buyer steps explained

Being able to take out a mortgage has become a major hassle for all types of home buyers, but especially first time buyers. Recently, a 2018 study by the Central Bank reported that the best position to be in so that your request for a loan can be approved by one of the 7 largest lending banks is in a couple with a substantial down payment already available.

This is most likely the case because a couple can bring in two salaries, making a steady stream of income more reliable even if one person were to lose their job. Additionally, having a large down payment reduces risk for the lender. If you were to foreclose on a property, meaning you couldn’t afford to pay your mortgage anymore, there would be significantly less consequences on the lender side.

Although this is an ideal situation for approval, it is not the only solution. Plenty of first time buyers are individuals without extremely high credit scores and salaries, but there are a few key parts that must be fulfilled in order …

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Problems of the Irish Housing Market

The Irish housing market has faced a drastic increase in price of homes over the last 30 years. Of course inflation has contributed to the increase of the cost of homes, but inflation cannot nearly explain the massive jump in prices of Irish homes. More specifically, costs of housing has jumped more than five times the cost of a home 30 years ago.

So what does explain the massive rise in costs of property prices? Could it be that increase in salaries contribute to the rise of price in homes? I know that the average income today is much higher than it was 30 years ago. However, the rate that average income has increased over the last few decades is nowhere near the amount that housing prices have increased.

The maximum mortgage loan a homebuyer can be granted is his or her average salary multiplied by 3.5. According to the Irish Mirror, the average take weekly income of an irish person is €734 per week. Multiply this by 52 and you have €38168 before taxes. Even income before tax …

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Help-to-buy incentive under scrutiny

This past Sunday, current Housing Minister Eoghan Murphy said on RTE’s The Week in Politics that the Help-to-Buy initiative introduced by his predecessor is currently under review. Since its introduction in January under former Finance Minister Michael Noonan and former Housing Minister Simon Coveney, the Help-to-Buy initiative has already received nearly 7,000 applicants and has successfully helped a great percentage of them with the purchase or building of their first home. However, the initiative has recently come under fire for exacerbating the problems it intended to solve, and there is speculation that it may be dissolved.

 

The purpose of the Help-to-Buy incentive was to encourage first buyers to enter the market by helping applicants with their deposit through the refund of applicants’ income tax and DIRT other the past 4 years. It applies to first time buyers who either purchase or build new residential properties, and allows them to receive 5% of the purchase price of their new home, with an upward limit of €20,000. It is hoped that the incentive would help more people climb the property ladder, …

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Analyzing rental yields – what this means for investors and renters

An article was published by Fiona Reddan on the Irish Times early this morning examining and evaluating property investment options in and around Dublin today. The article uses the measure of rental yields, how much rental income a property generates as a percentage of its market value, to compare the worthiness of investment options.

 

The major finding in the article was a negative correlation between housing prices and rental yields, meaning that, in Ireland, higher priced properties generate lower investment yields on average. The worst places to invest includes areas such as Dublin 6, Dublin 4, and Dublin 14, where average sale prices are well above €500,000. The best places to invest includes Dublin 10 and Dublin 2, where the average market value of property is much lower. In Dublin 6 for example, the average sale price is €706,741, while rental yields are only 3.6%. On the other hand, in Dublin 10, the average sale price is €173,478, but the annual rental yield is 10.4%.

 

These …

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A response to: Housing for homes – a classic case of market failure

A recent blog post published by Tom Healy, director of the Nevin Economic Research Institute, suggested that the current housing market in Ireland is an example of a failed market. Healy believes that the issue of under supply of housing can only be solved if the government expands provisions of social housing and extends its jurisdictions over prices and supply in the housing market.

Healy based his argument upon the assumption that the current housing market has failed and is unable to recover without intervention. He cites a chronic under supply of housing and the inability of government programs to sufficiently meet demand. While there is indeed a under supply of housing and rising prices due to pent up demand, a series of government construction plans such as the 2013 Forfas Strategy, Capital Investment Plan, and Action Plan for Housing and the Homeless, in addition to private investments are expected to dramatically increase housing supply within the next few years. These projects directly address the supply issue by promising 47,000 additional units of social housing before 2021.

The blog post …

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Yet Another Warning of a Property Bubble: More Perspectives

The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development has voiced fears that the economy is overheating. This comes soon after the Fiscal Advisory Council heeded similar warnings earlier this week.

The OECD believes that the banking system is still fragile, with bad loans still accounting for 17% of the total. And while the government has already put into place plenty of macro-prudential policies, there is still the possibility that rapidly rising prices lead to another bubble and burst that would disrupt the delicate economy.

Indicative of OEDC’s stance, overall property market prices are up 8.2% this year at the end of April. The boom in construction is already visible on Dublin’s skyline. Irish Times counted 70 construction cranes towering over Dublin from the 7th floor of their office building on June 1st. This number represents a sizable increase compared to the number Irish Times counted in the first few months of this year. The number of cranes is predicted to continue to rise based on the number of large …

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Dublin property prices 2012-2013

This post is a guest blog by a person who doesn’t want to be named.

The two year period between January 2012 and December 2013 was a remarkable period in the movement of the prices of houses and apartments in Dublin. The period started in January 2012 with house prices dropping by -21.7% from a year earlier while apartments dropped slightly less at -18.4% and yet by the end of the period.

In December 2013 house prices were rising by 15.3% annually with apartments rising further to 20.8% annually. Another feature of this period was the manner in which the prices moved, with house prices steadily slowing down their annual decline all through 2012 and from January 2013 to December 2013 having continuous positive increases in annual prices.

However apartment prices showed a lot more volatility over the period entering positive territory in February 2013 when compared to a year earlier but dipping back into negative figures for the next three months with the result that it was June before apartment prices showed increases on the same month a year …

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DECLG has ‘No Clue’ on housing alludes DIT Housing Lecturer

Lorcan Sirr, a housing lecturer at Dublin Institute of Technology in Bolton Street has been very critical of the Department of Environment on their approach to housing and recently wrote a piece about it on the Building Regs blog.

This considers things like the Building Control Regulations, planning regulations and Part V contributions. His closing line says it all “It’s quite difficult to engineer a situation in housing where everybody loses, but in the last 24 months the Department has managed to do that, repeatedly“.

To us this really says it all, everybody is losing in housing other than the people who already own houses and that was never meant to be how the housing market worked.

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