First time buyers who don’t buy new homes

First time buyers have been asking ‘what about those of us who are not buying a new home? Why don’t we get any help like the people using help to buy?’. The answer is that you do, at least for the remainder of 2017.

There is still a DIRT relief for first time buyers scheme in action, it started in 2014 and is ongoing until the 31st of December.

The scheme doesn’t help you get a deposit, rather it’s a refund after you buy, see the notes below taken from the Revenue.ie website:

Section 266A of the Taxes Consolidation Act 1997 provides for refunds of Deposit Interest Retention Tax (DIRT) for first-time buyers who purchase a house or apartment to live in as their home. It also applies to first time buyers who self-build a home to live in.

Who can claim it?

A first-time buyer of a house or apartment who purchases or self-builds a property between 14 October 2014 and 31 December 2017 may be entitled to claim a refund of DIRT.

The first-time buyer must not have …

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Two identical first time buyers walk into a bar, one qualifies, the other doesn’t

The Central Bank rules on curtailing mortgage lending have had an interesting effect, first is that we are seeing more loans draw down that might not have because people are bringing forward consumption due to the fact they won’t qualify for the same amount again in the future. This is literally the opposite of the intended effect.

Second is that it’s causing chaos for prospective buyers who may hold an exemption or need an exemption because there are quarterly reporting rules that mean banks can’t offer a new loan until they know if an old one will be drawn or become an NTU (not taken up).

Perhaps the easiest thing to do is explain it, currently you can’t get an exemption from Ulsterbank or AIB/EBS/Haven or BOI, but you can from PTsb and KBC. The banks that can’t give you one (and remember it’s only one of LTV or LTI not both) are hogtied because they have given the limit of exemptions (c. 15%-20% of lending) already in loan offers and they have to estimate both the annual and quarterly …

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Prudence puts you deeper in debt… Nice work by the Central Bank

The news that higher loan to values will have to be limited is being mistakenly applauded by many financial commentators, almost none of whom work in credit. Towards the end of the post we demonstrate that you can actually be worse off by being forced to wait and put down a larger deposit than if you acted normally and bought today with a 10% deposit.

That’s why taking a look at the numbers beneath and how it will affect mortgages is important. First time buyers are typically the younger end of the house owning spectrum, they largely chose to stay out of the market during the financial crisis, a good choice, very rational.

That is why the people renting rose so much between 2006 and 2011. A total of 474,788 households were in rented accommodation in 2011, a considerable rise of 47 per cent from 323,007 in 2006.

It created a build up of non-owners who want in, but who are not the main driver of property price increases …

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Apply for a mortgage online

There has been so much progress in the mortgage market, and nowadays so many companies have your information on file that many people reckon you can easily apply for a mortgage online, surely it wouldn’t be that big a deal right? In many cases you should also be able to get your conveyancing done in a similar manner with minimal upset, but in every respect there is almost no progress in terms of online trading for mortgages.

There are several software solutions that send information to a lender but none of them offer an actual ‘suite’ solution, by that we mean sending information, property auto-tagged pdf scans of documents, and the ability to synchronise updates so that a person can effectively deal with a lender over the web.

Every site you go to that says ‘apply online‘ is really saying ‘fill in our form and we’ll call you’ because there isn’t a way to fully apply for a mortgage online at present, and the job of …

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How much of a deposit do I need?

When making a mortgage application this is a question that many first time buyers want to know, how much money do I must I have for a deposit? Well, that kind of depends on which bank provides the mortgage finance!

Lending criteria is different for every bank/building society/lender, this goes for rates, the general underwriting criteria as well as the ‘loan to value‘, the deposit you need is 100% minus the Maximum LTV and that will give you the deposit amount you require. For instance, ICS have a maximum LTV of 92% so the deposit you need – if you are obtaining finance through them – is 100% – 92% = 8%.

What is interesting in that example is that when you go ‘sale agreed’ on a property the estate agent will ask for a security deposit and the balance of 10% at the signing of contracts, this is an example …

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