How to buy properties in Bulgaria

Hello my name is Hristo Dimitrov. I’m a student from Varna Bulgaria. I’m new to Irish Mortgage Brokers.

Today my topic is how to buy properties in Bulgaria

 

-First time buyers

When Bulgarian people are buying a home, they have some problems researching the right home for themselves.

They are also not familiar with how to buy a home. They always have problems and some may come across real estate fraud. So I will show you some helpful tips to follow:

Estimate your budget.

It is important to know how much money you are willing to spend on buying an apartment and navigating the cost of housing in your city.

Don’t do it yourself

Get a mortgage. If your own funds are not sufficient but you have a stable income, get a mortgage. Today, banks issue loans for ten to thirty years.

Get ready – wait for a new building.

Primary housing, that is, apartments in new buildings, are, on average, cheaper than second homes. They also have no legal history. And if the developer sells the property, …

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Hedgefunds, risk, and finding the silver lining of any dark cloud.

Here is a simple question: ‘how do you protect or even augment your portfolio returns when markets are crashing or where there is systemic risk?’ if you have an answer then you can be a little smug because the majority of fund managers, the best and brightest the world of finance has to offer, for the most part didn’t have an answer during the last two years and if they did they didn’t (by and large) act upon it.

The classic definition of a hedgefund is not the ponzi-schemes run by the likes of Bernie Madoff, rather it was a fund that strategically goes long and short to produce positive gains regardless of whether the market goes up or down, that was what Winslow Jones was doing when he started the first hedge fund in 1949, while managed fund managers are happy to post a 20% loss when the averaage is -30% (for instance), hedgefund managers are meant to be able to …

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The pincer of fixed rates while in negative equity

A recent article in the Independent stated that ‘fixed rate borrowers are taking all the pain’. The base rate has fallen from 4.25% to 1.25% with a further rate reduction expectation taking the EU to a base of 1%. What this means is that people who felt the drop off in base rates (tracker mortgage holders & most variable rate holders) are now better off to the tune of about €425 per month.

However, for those on fixed rates the story is the reverse of this, they have not felt any reduction in the amounts they are spending monthly while at the same time many have had to live on less due to wage cuts, levies, and job loss. The fees for ‘breaking’ a fixed rate are usually from 3 to 6 months of payments.

So what can you do? If you have the savings to pay for the move you can go that route, but if you have been …

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What next for Europe?

The Euro rose against the dollar as the Fed introduced quantitative easing, this will be furthered by the new TARP programme due to be released later today, Bank of England are also engaging in quantitative easing along with a near zero interest rate policy – one matched by both the USA and Japan.

So what will be the outcome for Europe? Essentially we will be forced to follow suit, rates will have to drop further and we will need to pursue in quantitative easing – via bond/paper purchases or otherwise. Why? Simply put, we cannot stand as an island in the global economy, we can’t stand as a continent when every other major economy is going to zero and going through what amounts to devaluation with increased money supply.

If the Euro rises too far against the Dollar or Sterling it will make exporting difficult (we’ll leave Ireland’s plight with Sterling zone exporters out of this …

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GO TO JAIL! Do not pass go, do not collect €200 million

The talk of ‘Economic Treason’ and calling for the heads of every banker are sadly starting to gain more and more traction, all of this is happening without concrete evidence thus far of exactly ‘who’ we are chasing and ‘for what’ specifically, largely the financial leaders greed is central to accusations of wrongdoing, and while greed may not be morally acceptable to right thinking individuals it is not actually a crime.

The FT recently had an article showing that executive pay misguided but that it didn’t make them criminal by nature, stupidity is an ‘equal opportuntities’ trait. It is important that every person in finance is not villified for what was something that all of society played a part in.

One question nobody is asking is ‘what part did I play in this?’, as a brokerage we are culpable, as a consumer I am personally culpable and as a citizen I will be paying for mistakes made on both …

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What stimulus is there after a 0% rate?

There are generally two strands to monetary stimulus, firstly there are interest rates, and then there is the actual money supply. We’ll talk about both of them here and what will mean for consumers.

Interest rate drops drive money into an economy in a few different ways, obvious to most is that the cost of borrowing comes down, so if a company has to borrow to hire people they can do so, people need less to service debts which increases their disposable income and that puts more money into circulation. The other thing that happens is that bank deposits look less attractive, interest rates dropping actually cause rate compression, something we discussed here before, and that means money (especially at a 0% interest rate) will not sit on deposit and will instead move to corporate bonds which will thus be a way of extending credit to companies and they can finance projects.

In the past many would ‘fly to quality’ …

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Every little helps…. Mortgages by Tesco?

I read an interesting article today (here) about Tesco. Apparently Tesco Personal Finance will offer mortgages in the UK in the near future, however, they have not decided if they will include broker facing product ranges in the recently announced offering.

The supermarket chain has taken on Benny Higgins, former head of retail business at HBOS, and in press over the weekend he says there are plans to expand the Tesco Personal Finance offering to include mortgage and current accounts products.

He said “Today there is an opportunity to be a responsible lender in mortgages. At present there are still funding problems but that will change. In the second quarter of next year financing will be freer and there could be a very active re-mortgaging market.”

Tesco have (in Ireland) faced bitter competition from discounters such as Aldi and Lidl, however, neither of those firms have entered into the personal finance arena. Tesco is already doing car insurance, …

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The demise of 100% Mortgages

Mortgages in Ireland continue to evolve, with 100% mortgages in Ireland now a thing of the past. We saw the 100% mortgage products die off here in 2008 because of falling asset prices, the credit crunch and liquidity problems banks are having. Assuming a mortgage will always be less than the value of a property is a misconception and for that reason many people are finding themselves in negative equity.

However, that isn’t the end of the world, if you are in negative equity the loss is ‘real’ but not ‘realised’ unless you sell up at a loss. This is perhaps not a cure but it gives some perspective to dealing with the situation. Our firm have been brokers in Dublin for quite some time, and combined we have over 100 years of experience in helping our clients get the cheapest mortgage rates and to make financial plans, however, in the current environment more than ever we are finding that broker advice is vital because there is literally so much at stake for peoples finances. Property is taking a hit, …

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