Looking to move to Dublin? Consider living in these areas

The city of Dublin is one of the most popular hubs for relocation for people from all over Ireland and the world. Divided into a north and south side by the Liffey River, Dublin has many great neighborhoods within its 24 postal districts. Boasting a population of 1.2 million people, more than 25% of the entire country’s population, Dublin is a busy city packed with a variety of inhabitants and lifestyles. Whatever type of lifestyle you’re looking for, there is a great neighborhood in Dublin that can suit your needs. Here is a brief look at some of the best locations in Dublin.

City Center South

Looking to live a city lifestyle, with great food and diverse nightlife? If so, City Center South may be for you. Though it may be a little more affluent and expensive to live in than its Northern counterpart, North Inner City, or D1, City Center South, known as D2, provides a great experience for those looking to live in a central location with lots of tourist attractions. Nearby attractions include the iconic Temple Bar, …

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Ulsterbank fire the next shot in the mortgage ‘rate-war’

Ulsterbank recently upped the ante in the mortgage rate-war by reducing a suite of their rates, the story was covered in the Independent which also quoted Irish Mortgage Brokers.

Karl Deeter said the cuts represent the latest shot to be fired in the mortgage rate war.

“In response to Avant Money’s European-style rates, Ulster Bank has had to respond and now it means that other lenders are under even greater pressure to follow or beat these rates.”

He said this means customers will win. But they have to switch lender is they are paying high rates.

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Why Use a Mortgage Broker?

You may not know whether or not you want to use a mortgage broker or why people use them in the first place. How do they help and what do they do? Let’s go over why people use mortgage brokers and what they do for you.

First of all what is a mortgage broker? A mortgage broker is a person that is working with you and the lenders. He is the middleman that will be advising you (client) on the mortgage that is going to work best for you.

Unlike banks, mortgage brokers can work with you and multiple lenders. They’re the middleman when it comes to getting you the mortgage that is going to work best for you. They can shop around for you, work with multiple banks, and work with you on problems that may occur. Since you are working one on one with a mortgage broker, they can also explain things and perhaps give you advice on how to improve in certain areas.

Working with a professional mortgage broker allows you the opportunity of possibly having them …

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Two identical first time buyers walk into a bar, one qualifies, the other doesn’t

The Central Bank rules on curtailing mortgage lending have had an interesting effect, first is that we are seeing more loans draw down that might not have because people are bringing forward consumption due to the fact they won’t qualify for the same amount again in the future. This is literally the opposite of the intended effect.

Second is that it’s causing chaos for prospective buyers who may hold an exemption or need an exemption because there are quarterly reporting rules that mean banks can’t offer a new loan until they know if an old one will be drawn or become an NTU (not taken up).

Perhaps the easiest thing to do is explain it, currently you can’t get an exemption from Ulsterbank or AIB/EBS/Haven or BOI, but you can from PTsb and KBC. The banks that can’t give you one (and remember it’s only one of LTV or LTI not both) are hogtied because they have given the limit of exemptions (c. 15%-20% of lending) already in loan offers and they have to estimate both the annual and quarterly …

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Irish Mortgage Brokers and MyHome.ie on TV3’s ‘The Morning Show’, 2nd March 2011

We were delighted to feature again on TV’s ‘The Morning Show with Sybil and Martin’ (although Brian was sitting in for Martin) on their monthly property slot.

This week we spoke about the necessity of price drops to get a property sold, it is likely the single most important factor, it is also overlooked that there is often a carry cost or opportunity cost loss if sellers don’t drop prices.

Next month we are likely to cover ’empties’, that will be a fascinating show worth tuning in for!

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The first time buyer conundrum, to buy or not to buy?

At the moment in Ireland there is a conundrum for first time buyers: should you buy now and potentially over-pay on purpose?

It’s an unusual one and it partly related to property prices, it is a combination of taxation changes that will occur from the start of 2012 and expectations of interest rate changes from both banks and the ECB.

The argument of ‘rent or buy‘ is well established, we produced report on it with Peter Stafford (now of the IAVI/SCS) and Frank Quinn of Senior College Dun Laoghaire, but this is different – buy now or buy later isn’t taking the default of renting as an assumed continuous option, rather it is a case of delaying for the sake of market timing.

The changes in tax are on the tax expenditure side, namely TRS (tax relief at source).

Currently it is applicable to a maximum of €10,000 p.a. and the rates applicable are …

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Property prices and property costs, they are not the same, so do you rent or buy?

We have seen a growing trend in our brokerage of people getting mortgage approvals (mainly first time buyers) and not drawing down, this might indicate some pent up demand in housing – which if it comes will be regular houses as opposed to apartments – or it indicates fear of buying in general.

The thing that is pervasive is the ‘price’ of housing, and the idea is to wait until we reach the bottom. That is a perfectly rational concept, and when you are not purchasing over a long term then the price now (we’ll take from financial market vernacular and call it the ‘spot price’ of housing) is the main thing to focus on.

However, that is only one part of the ‘price’ because the majority of new buyers are not buying for cash. The other price is the price of money, the financing costs. We indicated in our annual outlook that banks would, in 2011 alone, increase rates by a further 100bps or 1%, that any bank which isn’t government owned will have variable rates in the region …

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Household lending is up

It’s kind of funny how you can pick things up anecdotally and then see official figures confirm your suspicions. In August we saw a good number of draw-downs, I called a few friends in other brokers to see what was happening with them and they said the same thing, bumper numbers (albeit by 2010 standards they are still horrific).

The high savings rate has translated into a higher level of repayment/prepayment on mortgages, in our annual prediction we said that lending would sit still or drop for this very reason, but that may yet prove mistaken if the trend continues.

2010 is the first time I can remember ever having a flipped season, normally nothing happens in the summer, the action is all in spring and autumn. However, the thing that every other broker said [and this goes for our firm too] is that August wasn’t necessarily ‘busy’, rather it was the flow through of all the constipated pipeline of the first half of the year. That isn’t exactly a beautiful connotation but …

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AIB Interest Rate Hike: How much? To Who? What’ll it cost?

Yesterday AIB increased interest rates for both existing and new borrowers. This comes as a huge blow to consumers, in particular given that the consumer is the same taxpayer who has done so much to bail out the bank. Do people have the right to be angry? Hell yeah they do!

The move has been coming for quite some time, we have been harping on about this for over a year, the most recent prediction was to put a time-frame and figure on the hikes, stating that it would start in Q1 of 2010 and in the course of the year we’d see c. 100 basis points or 1% of an increase across the board with a further 50 basis points or 0.5% in 2011. Today’s Independent has stated that we can actually expect all of it in 2010.

Why is this happening?

Simply put, the banks are not charging enough to cover the costs of loans that are not performing. In a way you …

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