Advantages and Disadvantages of a long-term mortgage

In a major market innovation in the Irish Mortgage Market, Finance Ireland and Avant Money have introduced new long term mortgages. While longer term mortgages have never really took off in Ireland, they are very popular in other parts of Europe and worldwide. These mortgages can be attractive to borrowers for a number of reasons, but it is important to also consider the potential downsides before making the switch.

Pros

One of the biggest advantages provided by long term mortgage products is certainty. Unlike a two or three year fixed term, a 10 or 20 year mortgage will allow your monthly mortgage repayments to remain unchanged throughout the duration of the loan. This reliable and predictable payment can be very helpful when planning out your monthly and yearly personal finances. It also can be very helpful in determining what your home will cost after factoring in interest. With a long term fixed rate, you will be able to know exactly how much the home will cost you right away, while a shorter term fixed rate will change over the lifetime …

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How you can be approved for a mortgage in Ireland despite Central Bank’s rules

It’s no secret that house prices are continuing to rise in Ireland. Because of this, it is more important now than ever to maximize the amount that you are allowed to borrow. The Central Bank’s rules often do not make this process any easier, as many have criticized the Central Bank on its restrictive rules in terms of how much people are allowed to borrow. To be approved for a mortgage in Ireland, you first have to fall within the Central Bank’s income rules. Second, your lender will evaluate your repayment capacity.

First, the Central Bank restricts lenders to loans of 3.5 times the borrowers’ income (joint and single), unless they are granted an exemption. This means that someone making €40,000 can borrow up to €140,000, and a couple making €100,000 combined can borrow up to €350,000, respectively.  However, to be approved for a mortgage, they must also pass a stress test, per Central Bank rules. This tests the ability of the borrower to repay the loan each month should interest rates rise by 2 percent above what the lender …

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PRA warns against 35 year mortgages in England

Traditionally, banks have offered mortgage terms of 25 years to buyers, a long enough time so that buyers can have both low monthly payments and a moderate level of total interest paid. In recent years however, there has been a trend towards mortgage loans of even longer terms, those 35 years or longer in the UK mortgage market. By extending the duration of loans, banks have reduced the amount borrowers pay as monthly instalments, thus making housing appear more affordable in the short run. Despite its apparent benefits however, the Prudential Regulation Authority (PRA) of the Bank of England has issued warnings about these loans and their risks and consequences.

 

Earlier this week, in a speech intended to be delivered in May but pushed back due to the election, head of the PRA, Sam Woods warned lenders about offering long term mortgages. With mortgages of over 35 years, there is an increase likelihood that the later instalments would have to be paid with post retirement income. Woods and the agency believes that this dramatically increases the risk of these …

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