CSO reports employment increases

March of 2012 marked one one of the highest rates of unemployment since the beginning of the 2000s. January 2012 was the peak, with unemployment reaching a whopping 16pc of the entire willing and able working population. 

Since then, unemployment rates have been decreasing steadily by 2-3pc every 2 years. From 2013 to Q1 of 2019, there was a was a 21.7pc increase, or 409,900 people, increase in employment; this percentage was almost entirely made of full time employment gains. 

The total number of people that are employed now is 2,301,900, of which “1,828,900 or 79.5pc were in full-time employment while 473,000 or 20.5pc were in part-time employment” according to the Central Statistics Office (CSO). 

Of these increases, there was growth in every one of the ten recorded occupational groups. Some of these groups include managers, directors and seniors, misc. Professionals, associate professional and technical, administrative and secretarial, and skill trade among many others. 

Another statistic that has shown significant improvement is that of the 473,000 people who are employed part time, only 16.1pc of these people were so because …

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A 'Knowledge' based economy

Today the Irish Times had an article about an American University opening a college here, in Dungarvan Co. Waterford. It occured to me that the Island of Saints and Scholars could do with trying to encourage this type of investment if we are to truly become a ‘knowledge economy’. In creating centres of excellence it is vital to ensure that the best research and advancement is happening in a certain place, in I.T. that may be Silicon Valley, in Finance the City of London prevails.

Harvard University Professors are not paid millions, rather they teach there for prestige. With Universities such as Trinity and our strong heritage of learning (if you want an interesting take on our written word tradition a book called ‘How the Irish saved civilization‘ is fascinating) there is no reason we should not see more universities wanting to locate here and have …

Read More

A ‘Knowledge’ based economy

Today the Irish Times had an article about an American University opening a college here, in Dungarvan Co. Waterford. It occured to me that the Island of Saints and Scholars could do with trying to encourage this type of investment if we are to truly become a ‘knowledge economy’. In creating centres of excellence it is vital to ensure that the best research and advancement is happening in a certain place, in I.T. that may be Silicon Valley, in Finance the City of London prevails.

Harvard University Professors are not paid millions, rather they teach there for prestige. With Universities such as Trinity and our strong heritage of learning (if you want an interesting take on our written word tradition a book called ‘How the Irish saved civilization‘ is fascinating) there is no reason we should not see more universities wanting to locate here and have …

Read More