Mortgage providers to restrict rural lending

We were mentioned in the Irish Independent today in a story about lenders restricting mortgage credit in rural areas. They are doing this by lowering LTV’s or coming up with requirements on population size for LTV’s (Loan to Values).

Mortgage broker Karl Deeter of Irish Mortgage Brokers said lenders were now discriminating against those seeking loans to buy property in rural areas. “If you are not buying in Dublin, Cork, Limerick or Galway cities they do not want to know. This is all part of a growing trend to discriminate against properties outside of the cities,” Mr Deeter said.

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TV3 ‘The Morning Show with Sybil & Martin’ featuring Irish Mortgage Brokers 11th Jan 2011

We were delighted to be part of TV3’s ‘The Morning Show, with Sybil & Martin‘. We are fans of the show and enjoy the relaxed nature of the conversational commentary style they are so adept at. In this clip we spoke about the costs of finance and the potential removal of fixed rates, while Marian Finnegan (of SherryFitzgerald) covers housing, her background is in urban economics and she lectured at both NUIG and UL before moving to SherryFitzgerald. We hope you enjoy the clip.

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Primetime: Housing & Mortgage piece, 5th October 2010

We were delighted to appear on RTE’s Primetime with Miriam O’Callaghan, whe I converted the video the sync went weird so you can find the original here.

Primetime looked at the property market news of a 40% drop in prices from peak to date and after the package piece they had an ‘in studio’ piece. The debate centred around property and mortgages as well as some of the issues regarding negative equity.

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Household lending is up

It’s kind of funny how you can pick things up anecdotally and then see official figures confirm your suspicions. In August we saw a good number of draw-downs, I called a few friends in other brokers to see what was happening with them and they said the same thing, bumper numbers (albeit by 2010 standards they are still horrific).

The high savings rate has translated into a higher level of repayment/prepayment on mortgages, in our annual prediction we said that lending would sit still or drop for this very reason, but that may yet prove mistaken if the trend continues.

2010 is the first time I can remember ever having a flipped season, normally nothing happens in the summer, the action is all in spring and autumn. However, the thing that every other broker said [and this goes for our firm too] is that August wasn’t necessarily ‘busy’, rather it was the flow through of all the constipated pipeline of the first half of the year. That isn’t exactly a beautiful connotation but …

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KBC move to 90% LTV

This is a very healthy sign for the mortgage market, and in our opinion it could mean that 2010 might mark the low point for credit that we have been watching out for.

In 2009 KBC under-lent, they had €1bn and didn’t lend out anywhere near that, they are also here to stay, and prior to the crisis they had about 1/8th of the market share. The fact that they are rolling out a higher loan to value is a very confident sign that

Banks have a few internal policy tools to control lending 1.    Curtailing the amount of lending – we see that already, mortgage lending is about 85% down from the peak of 40bn p.a. , peak wasn’t exactly a gauge of normal, but half of that would be normal, and even on that basis it’s down 75% – that story still has to play out 2.    Rate increases: this has the same effect as central bank rate increases, it reduces lending and everybody has increased their margins by at least 1% in the last year, you and …

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How Negative Equity can cause arrears.

A recent report by Moody’s pointed out that increased negative equity will cause a rise in arrears. The commentary surrounding this (in Ireland) takes the view that correlation is not necessarily causation. That people in negative equity won’t automatically go into arrears unless they cannot pay, that negative equity of itself is only an issue if you lose your job or have to sell. This is a valid opinion but it ignores the operational aspect of a household in respect of the way that they react when financial difficulty occurs.

There are several hundred thousand households in negative equity, and about 35,000 in serious arrears, how many of those people would not be in arrears if they were not in negative equity? The answer is: how ever many would have sold their house as a solution.

The first thing many people do if they know they are going to be headed for a situation where they stand no chance of paying their mortgage is to put their home up for sale, in …

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