Affordable Home Schemes

With the current housing crisis in the midst of the country, many plans have been developed to get the country out of its current slump. Some merely get laughed at, while others are well on their way to implementation within the housing market. It is likely that before long these effects will take a toll in the market and we will begin to see some upward movement in home buyer confidence.

The government has been quick to release multiple initiatives set out with the goal to turn the crisis around and allow the market to begin looking up. The Home Loan Scheme recently announced by the government is designed with the strategic plan to provide low-cost mortgages to first time home buyers.

With the first announcement of such a plan, many home buyers are thinking; is this too good to be true? As they have been waiting for an extended period of time for some light to be shed on the crisis that allows them to finally move into the homeowner sector.

The Rebuilding Ireland Home Loan …

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RTE: Sean O’Rourke Show, hard to help the homeless 8th May 2018

We were asked to speak on the Sean O’Rourke show about one landlords experience and how the experience left them feeling very negative towards the local authority.

We would believe that in order to remedy our housing crisis, in particular the homelessness element of it, that state power must to work as positively as possible with all of those who are involved including landlords. Serving a notice of a €5,000 fine and threats of prison for minor infractions is not part of how that comes about.

Dublin City Council have turned the landlord in question diametrically against helping more people in homelessness in the future. If this pattern of behaviour is repeated again and again across the city it is no wonder that helping people out of homelessness has become such a slow process.

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Today FM: Varadkar comments on housing deposits discussed

We were on Today FM to talk about comments made by the Taoiseach regarding how people come up with money for a deposit to buy a home. While many were finding it a source of outrage, we were making the point that it’s incredibly common and that it actually is a normal occurrence albeit not ‘the norm’ for everybody (because nothing is universal).

This is a good discussion because in our view it shows the way that housing shortages can turn into all manner of talking point arguments, we don’t think it’s realistic to tell parents you can’t help your kids or to say that it’s wrong in any way, but we do agree with Sinead from TheJournal that we have a housing shortage and that this is really where the problem lies.

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Today FM ‘Last Word’ speaks to Irish Mortgage Brokers, 27th April 2017

Matt Cooper had several guests in to discuss the new proposal for 800 sites owned by the government to be released in order to provide new housing.

There was  Jim Bainam from the Department of Housing, Karl Deeter from Irish Mortgage Brokers and Sinn Fein TD Eoin O’Brionn.

There were differences of opinion in terms of the ‘how’ regarding the sites, in terms of ‘how they are delivered’ via housing bodies, local authorities or privately, but all of the panellists were positive about a move to increase housing supply.

The main thing to remember in our view, is that it doesn’t really matter who builds what because the local authority remain the tax authority on all housing so they can get the housing with no capital outlay and then capture the property tax in future years if a private developer does it.

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Generation Rent? Try generation Broke

It bothers me when people promote long-term renting as a better choice than home ownership because it belies some basic facts.

When I was studying accounting, I was taught to be accurate. When I was learning about financial advice, I was taught to be prudent. Yet both of these concerns are often cast aside when debating the benefits of buying versus renting.

Nationally we are at an important juncture. It’s acknowledged that huge numbers of people won’t be able to afford to buy a home. If this proves to be true, many will also be locked out of one of life’s most wealth-creating activities.

The first problem is the nature of the comparison. If rent is €1,300 a month and a mortgage costs €1,500, then it’s cheaper to rent, right? Well . . . no it isn’t. The outlay is less, but the actual cost of the provision of occupancy is the rent versus the interest portion of the mortgage, not the entire payment. I will explain that point.

People often say rent is dead money. To be fair, so …

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Why are houses so expensive?

This is an excellent piece which really spells out one of the issues that we face in the Irish housing market. The default position of NIMBY’ism in many areas (Dublin being its epicentre). Some of the conclusions or beliefs that there are absolute answers are clearly way off the mark, but the cut and thrust of the video in terms of people saying ‘no’ and some of the reasons behind it make sense.

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Higher rent supplement, sometimes you just can’t win.

Raising rent supplement is a tricky solution to a housing shortage for a few reasons. Firstly, if you increase purchasing power where there is scarcity it will likely serve to drive up prices generally.

Think about the following scenario, Joe RentSupplement is trying to rent a home that Jim PrivateRenter also wants, what it boils down to is private renters versus publicly funded renters, and in that mix one now has higher purchasing power.

What is the one simple thing the privately funded renter can now do? Raise their price, this is how they outbid the publicly funded renter, Joe  RentSupplement is still out of a place to call home.

What are the solutions? More public housing – but perhaps not with a ‘for the rest of your life‘ tenancy agreement forming the basis of it. The other thing would be to allow increases for tenancies in situ. This last point cannot be overlooked.

Many of the new homeless come from the private rented sector. This occurs when the prices they are asked to pay are beyond their affordability, far …

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Claire Byrne show, 23rd May 2016

This clip is a good insight into the many facets of the housing debate when looking at the ‘crisis’ end of the spectrum. It raised some interesting issues and commentary. One thing we want to state is that there was an implication that if a fund bought your mortgage that you might be able to get thrown out rapidly, we should state clearly that this simply isn’t the case and is likely a misinterpretation of fact than a stance which is there to deliberately mislead.

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Rising rents will be followed by higher prices.

The lesser discussed problem of rising rents will be the rising prices of the next few years, we see it as a foregone conclusion that price pressure will be upwards as long as rents are rising.

This occurs for several reasons, first is that higher rents compel renters into the purchasing space, those that can move must have sufficient savings and earnings to do so, but equally, those that can afford high rents – and to escape them via a purchase, are exactly the ones who will make that choice.

There is a tricky relationship between rents and prices, but as can be seen from the chart showing the last 25yrs there is some correlation.

What we can see is that often when rents are rising that prices then catch up, at times rents can even be falling and prices still go up – this is perhaps due to the delayed nature of the commitment to a property contract which can be long drawn out.

What you don’t see for long in that chart is rents rising …

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Economic Factors affecting Irish Property Market (part I)

Background: The Irish residential property market has gone from a period of spectacular growth, to a dramatic crash and lately to recovery in the past ten and half years (2005 – 2015) the period I will concentrate on in this article.

The economic factors which influenced these major upheavals are many and varied such as Interest Rates, Unemployment, Population Growth, Demographics, Wage Inflation, Exchange Rates vs Sterling & the US Dollar, Budget Measures, Central Bank borrowing limits, Credit Availability, Rents, Sentiment & Stock Market performance.

This is not an exhaustive list but it does show the range of factors that can influence property price movements with some having a much more dramatic effect than others. Here I will confine my analysis to the influence four key factors played on residential property prices in Ireland during the period discussed.

These are Unemployment, Migration, Exchange Rates & Sentiment. Firstly I will look at the property prices themselves and how they have behaved during the period.

Property Prices:

In the early part of the period under review (2005 to 2007) property prices increased …

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