CSO reports employment increases

March of 2012 marked one one of the highest rates of unemployment since the beginning of the 2000s. January 2012 was the peak, with unemployment reaching a whopping 16pc of the entire willing and able working population. 

Since then, unemployment rates have been decreasing steadily by 2-3pc every 2 years. From 2013 to Q1 of 2019, there was a was a 21.7pc increase, or 409,900 people, increase in employment; this percentage was almost entirely made of full time employment gains. 

The total number of people that are employed now is 2,301,900, of which “1,828,900 or 79.5pc were in full-time employment while 473,000 or 20.5pc were in part-time employment” according to the Central Statistics Office (CSO). 

Of these increases, there was growth in every one of the ten recorded occupational groups. Some of these groups include managers, directors and seniors, misc. Professionals, associate professional and technical, administrative and secretarial, and skill trade among many others. 

Another statistic that has shown significant improvement is that of the 473,000 people who are employed part time, only 16.1pc of these people were so because …

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Bear with me, we'll talk about 'Bears'

Here are a set of charts (compliments of dshort.com)

Below is a chart of the four major bear markets we have seen in the last 100 years. The only one that has been bigger than the current graph is that of the Great Depression.

Then next graph is one of the S&P 500 since the 50’s showing the level of fall out in each market, the grey band (width) gives an indication of the number of months each one lasted. Using the S&P as an indicator of general market health is the foundation of each of these graphs, while it doesn’t represent the entire market it does have the major companies in the index. Click here to see a chart where you can view each bear market in greater detail.

The current bear market is last, and it shows that we entered a bear market in July of 08′. Typically …

Read More

Bear with me, we’ll talk about ‘Bears’

Here are a set of charts (compliments of dshort.com)

Below is a chart of the four major bear markets we have seen in the last 100 years. The only one that has been bigger than the current graph is that of the Great Depression.

Then next graph is one of the S&P 500 since the 50’s showing the level of fall out in each market, the grey band (width) gives an indication of the number of months each one lasted. Using the S&P as an indicator of general market health is the foundation of each of these graphs, while it doesn’t represent the entire market it does have the major companies in the index. Click here to see a chart where you can view each bear market in greater detail.

The current bear market is last, and it shows that we entered a bear market in July of 08′. Typically …

Read More