U.S Housing Market since ’08

It’s been ten years since the U.S. housing market crashed and caused many banks to close their doors and many people to lose their homes.

The question today is, has the market recovered? It depends on where you look….it is predicted that the market will have fully recovered by 2025, says Ralph McLaughlin, chief economist.

When predicting the recovery of the housing market, it is vital that you keep in mind the key factor of location.

Housing development varies greatly from state to state and it is places like California where we see a complete recovery in some areas and little to no recovery in others.

Such a large range between close by spaces is due to factors such as the city’s overall well-being. By this, I mean population growth and job outlook.

When a community is expanding and working within its own limits it is inevitable that different areas in the community will also look up, such as the housing market.

When developing the statistics in assessing the recovery of the housing market we compare current data to pre-recession …

Read More

TodayFM ‘The Last Word’ features Irish Mortgage Brokers

We were asked to take part in a segment called ‘Home Truths’ on TodayFM during the Last Word with Matt Cooper. The segment featured Karl Deeter and David Silke from the housing agency.

We were discussing the rental market and certain issues that go along with it, our main point is that there shouldn’t be a housing crisis, but that we managed to manufacture one.

The audio clip has the full segment on it.

Read More

No credit? Try some dodgy tax incentives (they work)

The recent Central Bank report on a property market that has ‘overshot’ is front page news on the broadsheets. This phenomena has been well observed in other jurisdictions and the question now is whether we will be more ‘European’ in our property market or if we’ll turn Japanese.

A key issue pointed out consistently is the role of credit. Cheap credit is often cited as one of the drivers of the property bubble, an NBER paper suggests it is only a component of about 20% of prices. The absence of credit is equally being seen as a downward driver of prices.

One of my minor hobbies is the history of Irish banking from an operational perspective, and on rare occasions it offers a nugget of insight.

In the late 1970’s Irish banks were not involved in mortgages, and only a few years before that they were not involved in hire purchase, they didn’t …

Read More