Start-up to Cause Shift in Housing Market

As I have previously written, the Irish housing market is currently experiencing a great crisis. With nearly no answers, the public is scrambling to find a way out, a way to the surface of all this financial distress.

This is where the Irish start-up Moove comes into play.

They’re entering the market with a goal to disrupt the market and give buyers and seller more choices and control during the sale of a home.

Yet to fully enter the Irish market, they are basing and forecasting the success of their business on the hybrid online model, currently based in the UK.

This model is currently offering sellers savings up to 7,200 euro!

Founder of Moove, David Madden started his career at the age of 17 as an estate agent at his parent’s business.

Having worked in the real estate business for many years, he has great potential in the start-up of such an inventive company.

Moove is designed to provide the same services one would find from a regular real estate agent, starting at a base cost of 1,800 euro.

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Irish Housing Market Trends

Ireland has seen a hit take place in recent years as property market seems to be downsizing. Families, with two full-time working partners, are finding it difficult to afford houses at their current increasing costs.

It has even been reported by Mark Keenan, a writer for business property and mortgages that working families are struggling to rent as well.

The average working couple in Ireland is earning a combined income of 70,000 euros. This is far below what a couple needs to earn to afford a home today.

It is reported that the average home in Dublin is now priced at mid 400,000 levels. Much more than what the average working couple could afford.

In just the last three months, there has been a multiple week increase to sell a home in Dublin. The housing market is slowing down and it’s slowing down fast.

Why is it that homes are being put on the market for such high prices? It could be that those selling the homes are finding it hard to sell for less …

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Why the American Housing Market is Crashing

With housing being the most affordable it has been since the mid-1970’s, why are Americans choosing to rent instead of buy?

Many good things are to come by investing property, one of the best ones being the extremely high returns that can be received.

With mortgage rates at an all-time low, many areas with generally inexpensive rental properties are still proving to be more costly to live in, relative to the alternative of buying into the housing market.

The National Association of Realtors is even expecting rent costs to increase up to 5% over the upcoming years, giving any person a difficult purpose to justify renting over buying.

Caitlin McCabe suggests that part of the hardship is a “housing hangover” that was caused by the market crash of ’08. Many American homeowners are still experiencing a considerable loss while they have more to pay on their mortgages then what their home is even worth.

McCabe also did a study in which she found that less than one-third of those that lost their homes due to foreclosure plan to return to …

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Should we enforce more regulations for the housing market?

In reference to Michael O’Flynn backs tax on those hoarding development land by

Ciarán Hancock on June 21, 2017 in the Irish Times.

Michael O’Flynn, a property developer, gives support to a tax to those who are hoarding land and waiting until the housing prices increase. This tax has to be carefully composed in order to avoid taxing those who can’t build because of issues surrounding planning, lack of infrastructure, or zoning. This would be difficult to police and enforce due to fraud or proof of these issues.

O’Flynn also suggested the government to create a government separate entity to help coordinate the planning and zoning issues as well as manage infrastructure spending. This is so the two processes can better work together and help combat the housing issue.

If the government will reduce the VAT 4.5% from 13.5% to 9%, Michael O’Flynn …

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An Upscale Dorm for Adults

With reference to Co-living goes mainstream, but this is not roommate roulette by Diana Olick

A new housing trend called ‘co-living’ is an upgraded version of low cost living geared for young professionals. The concept of co-living works like a college dorm, complete strangers living in an apartment together with shared living spaces. The catch is every roommate has to sign their own lease so there is liability for their roommates.

The idea came from an increase of housing costs in Chicago and there was no place for two guys, Ryan Shear and Noah Gottlieb, to live so they created this new style targeted for the young professional. It gives another option for people moving to a new city who don’t want the liability of sharing a lease with a stranger but wants to meet new people. It comes with a bedroom and bathroom to yourself and a shared-furnished common area. There is also cleaning services that come and clean the common area.

Gottlieb found the demand to be stronger than expected in Chicago with average age of renters …

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Donald Trump…. Banks are not lending

Donald Trump talks to CNBC about banks saying that they are not lending to anybody. An interesting clip, he talks candidly about The Apprentice but then gets on to the serious business of the lending market.

He has some pragmatic ideas and an unforgiving opinion of the absence of skill he has witnessed in the finance world, and asking why some were paid so much to do so little. Donald Trump is a ‘shoot from the hip’ type of guy, he has had some spectacular rises and falls and it is perhaps that roller-coaster of success that makes him such an enigmatic character.

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