Intriguing Statistics of First-Time Buyers

Perfect Property has recently found success in finding the common budget of the average house hunter in Dublin.

While in such a crisis, this is information that has been found is essentially vital in understanding a piece to the puzzle of what keeps buyers from buying.

Of course, there are statistics on the shortage of homes compared to the increasing demand, a factor into understanding the crisis that is just as vital.

According to Perfect Property, a relatively new search engine, the average Dublin house hunter has a budget of €315,000 to purchase a home with.

A pretty substantial budget for any home buyer, however, we are still observing a vast amount of first-time buyers applying for the new state mortgage scheme, introduced just a few months prior.

A scheme that was expected to cover nearly 1,000 loans and last for an extended period of time is now lucky if it lasts the full year.

Of course, when looking in the Dublin area it can be expected that the budget for a home will …

Read More

Irish Housing Market Trends

Ireland has seen a hit take place in recent years as property market seems to be downsizing. Families, with two full-time working partners, are finding it difficult to afford houses at their current increasing costs.

It has even been reported by Mark Keenan, a writer for business property and mortgages that working families are struggling to rent as well.

The average working couple in Ireland is earning a combined income of 70,000 euros. This is far below what a couple needs to earn to afford a home today.

It is reported that the average home in Dublin is now priced at mid 400,000 levels. Much more than what the average working couple could afford.

In just the last three months, there has been a multiple week increase to sell a home in Dublin. The housing market is slowing down and it’s slowing down fast.

Why is it that homes are being put on the market for such high prices? It could be that those selling the homes are finding it hard to sell for less …

Read More

Mortgage approvals up 45% in May

Data released by the Banking and Payments Federation Ireland revealed that mortgage approvals have gone up 35% May of this year in comparison to May of 2016.

 

There were a total of 4,124 mortgages approved in May, with a combined value of €884 million. This represents an increase of 1,078 mortgages and a €275 value compared to May of 2016.

 

This increase in mortgage approvals is likely caused by lower interest rates and by greater general confidence in the economy. It also represents a continuously growing demand in the housing market, and a supply that is slowly but surely catching up.

 

First time buyer mortgage approvals in particular are up 45.8%, the value of such mortgages also saw an even more dramatic increase of 60.7% compared to May of last year. This indicates growing confidence on the part of borrowers. First time buyers are purchasing more expensive housing and are seeing housing prices rise.

 

It is …

Read More

Help-to-buy incentive under scrutiny

This past Sunday, current Housing Minister Eoghan Murphy said on RTE’s The Week in Politics that the Help-to-Buy initiative introduced by his predecessor is currently under review. Since its introduction in January under former Finance Minister Michael Noonan and former Housing Minister Simon Coveney, the Help-to-Buy initiative has already received nearly 7,000 applicants and has successfully helped a great percentage of them with the purchase or building of their first home. However, the initiative has recently come under fire for exacerbating the problems it intended to solve, and there is speculation that it may be dissolved.

 

The purpose of the Help-to-Buy incentive was to encourage first buyers to enter the market by helping applicants with their deposit through the refund of applicants’ income tax and DIRT other the past 4 years. It applies to first time buyers who either purchase or build new residential properties, and allows them to receive 5% of the purchase price of their new home, with an upward limit of €20,000. It is hoped that the incentive would help more people climb the property ladder, …

Read More

Bank of Ireland cuts mortgage rates

Bank of Ireland recently announced new and reduced mortgage rates, which will be available starting Friday the 16th. The highlight is cuts of fixed mortgages rates up to 0.35% for both existing customers and for first-time buyers. The bank decision ups its competition in Ireland’s reviving property market and marks Bank of Ireland as the fourth lender that has cut its rates within the last two months. KBC Bank cut its fixed rate in April, and currently has one of the lowest rates on the market. Permanent TSB and Ulster Bank are the other two lenders who have also taken similar measures.

 

Bank of Ireland’s fixed rate mortgages are based on a property’s loan to value ratio. It has cut its rates for first time buyers with an Loan to Value ratio of 81-90% by 0.25%. Customers with greater down payments and lower Loan to Values ratios also see their mortgage rates cut between 0.1%-0.25%. The greatest reductions however have been for Bank of Ireland’s existing customers, who see their mortgage rates fall by 0.35% if they have a …

Read More

Only 2,800 first time buyers would have been affected…

Patrick Honohan told the Oireachtas committee a few days ago that “2,800 mortgages issued in 2013 would have been affected by the proposed new lending rules”.

There are a few reasons why this is bad use of data. For a start, in 2013 in gross numbers there were 14,984 mortgages drawn down. If you strip out re-mortgages, switchers, top ups and investment loans to get an idea of the actual ‘home purchase’ group it comes down to 12, 875 which means 22% of all loans.

Secondly, 2013 is a low level year in lending, the charts below show the draw-downs and the number of loans, they are at anaemic levels and don’t show any sign of a credit bubble in a country that is still rapidly deleveraging.

How can this be interpreted as a rising risk? The rising prices are a separate issue, but that some wave of credit is ready to swamp down on limited supply denies the fact that most of the market is in cash …

Read More

Central Bank Mortgage Cap Calculator: did you get shafted?

We have designed a simple calculator that lets you put in your property price, what rents you are currently paying, how you think prices will change and how many years it would take you to save a 20% deposit if you only have 10% now.

Just download the excel file, fill in the bright yellow boxes on the first sheet, and then scroll down to the green area to find out if you win or got shafted. (download here)

You can play around with different scenarios, but suffice to say that a regular couple who have €25,000 saved up and are looking to buy a property for €250,000 today will be worse off if rents and property prices went up by 2% a year (and it took them 4 years to save the additional deposit required) to the tune of €15,500.

We don’t believe it is in the remit of the Central Bank to damage the balance sheets of financially healthy individuals, but you can test your own hypothesis and see how it …

Read More

Mortgage to rent in as bad a shape as the mortgage market

I think Ciaran Lynch hit the nail on the head when he said the ‘mortgage to rent’ scheme risks ‘becoming a flop‘. The issue here comes down to the creditors treatment of borrowers.

We have already posted a letter from Pepper showing how they are willing to do write-downs for customers. This is there for anybody to see, it isn’t here-say or rumour. In that case the loans of GE Money (a sub-prime lender) were sold to another company at a big loss.

The buyer of the loan buys it for say, 36c on the Euro meaning a loan for €100,000 is purchased for €36,000. What happens next is that they write to the borrower and say ‘hey borrower, if you pay me €50,000 and make all of your payments then we’ll call it quits’.  Meaning the borrower gets a €50,000 debt write off for either paying their loan or selling up.

This is a strong incentive to do the right thing, and it …

Read More