Could Ireland be a leader in fintech development?

The financial technology (fintech) industry has seen rapid growth worldwide, in time with the rapid progress of technology itself. Examples of new products that have come with this trend are loan management software, crypto-currencies, and more. These products can be targeted for use by businesses as well as the average consumer, and together they led fintech to become a $200 billion industry worldwide in 2019; it is expected to be worth around $305 billion by 2025. The leader countries in fintech development as of 2020 include the U.S., the UK, and Singapore, with developing countries like China also expected to become major players in the near future.

However, Ireland may also have the potential to become a global fintech hub in the near future. Ireland’s pro-business governance makes it an appealing place for businesses looking to enter the industry. One aspect of this appeal is its low corporate tax rate of 12.5%. Additionally, its research & development tax credit of 25% makes it very friendly to tech companies and encourages continued innovation. Its double taxation agreements with many other EU …

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Opening times and service during the Covid19 crisis.

We are dedicated to serving our clients in the face of any interruption or adversity. For this reason we have made arrangments for our team to work remotely other than for some of the management who are taking care of essential elements of the business and in line with the Central Bank of Ireland guidelines on the matter.

We are still able to work with you online, our team have phones diverted to their mobiles or are using software phones in remote locations. There are going to be delays though, that is to be expected as bank teams are very busy and also trying to work remotely. We will monitor the situation and update you should anything change, if there is no update you can assume we are back to full regular business ‘as usual’ upon the announcement that people can return to work.

 

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Mortgage Questions: I am not in permanent employment. Can I get a mortgage?

Answer: If you are not in Permanent employment no mainstream mortgage lender will consider a mortgage application from you, while that may sound harsh, it reflects the reality in lending that the main thing a lender needs is security that the borrower has the capacity to pay back the loan in the future. Sub-prime Lender Start Mortgages may consider an application, but if you opt for a specialist lender you will pay  for it via the margin on their lending, they take on risky applications but they charge accordingly. The maximum loan they will lend is 75% of the purchase price. This type of application is assessed on a case by case basis & will depend on the length of your contract served etc. the length of contract remaining and your previous employment history.

However, to give a short concise answer – generally banks won’t lend to you if you are not in permanent employment, this is a question you will be asked by your mortgage adviser and it also appears on your salary cert.

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Banks need to stress test themselves

Reverse stress testing has been advised by the FSA (Financial Services Authority) in the UK who have said that stress testing in UK financial firms is too weak to prevent another Northern Rock crisis. They are advising firms to do “reverse stress tests” to identify high-risk scenarios. The want banks, building societies, investment firms and insurers to consider scenarios that may cause their firms business to become unviable.

Normally ‘stress testing’ refers to something banks do when considering clients, they stress loan rates taking into account potential rate hikes, but they have never been asked to stress test their own business models in the way they are presently being asked to do.

In a consultation paper published yesterday, the FSA said UK firms were still not testing themselves against sufficiently severe scenarios. The proposed changes are intended to better reflect the importance that is attached to robust stress and scenario testing and to clarify the Regulators expectations of firms.

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