Strengths and weaknesses of interest-only mortgages

Interest-only mortgages have surged in popularity within the mortgage industry, offering a distinctive structure and potential advantages. Yet, like any financial tool, they come with both pros and cons that warrant careful consideration for prospective homebuyers. In this article, we delve into the merits and drawbacks of interest-only mortgages, empowering you to make a well-informed decision regarding their suitability for your journey to homeownership.

Interest-only mortgages offer several appealing advantages. Initially, they feature lower monthly payments compared to conventional mortgages. During the initial period, borrowers are solely responsible for paying the interest portion of the loan, resulting in more manageable payments, particularly in the early stages of owning a home. Moreover, opting for an interest-only mortgage can free up additional cash flow, which borrowers can redirect towards other financial objectives or investments. This flexibility is especially beneficial for individuals with variable income or those seeking to optimize investment opportunities. Furthermore, some borrowers may opt for interest-only mortgages to invest the savings from lower mortgage payments into higher-yielding investments. Financially savvy borrowers may reap rewards if these investments yield returns surpassing …

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Understanding the Impact: How Interest Rate Hikes Affect Irish Mortgages

In this blog, we journey through the intricate world of interest rates and their profound influence on our mortgages. With recent rumblings of potential interest rate hikes, it’s essential to understand how these changes can impact our financial lives. We’ll explore the key aspects of interest rate hikes, their implications for Irish mortgages, and provide real-life examples to help you grasp their significance. So, let’s dive in and gain a deeper understanding of this critical subject.

 

The Basics: Interest Rates and Mortgages

Before we delve into the impact of interest rate hikes, let’s refresh our understanding of the fundamentals. Interest rates are the cost of borrowing money, and they directly affect the amount you pay on your mortgage. When interest rates rise, the cost of borrowing increases, leading to adjustments in mortgage payments. Conversely, when rates decrease, mortgage payments may become more affordable.

The Ripple Effect: Monthly Mortgage Payments

Interest rate hikes have a direct impact on your monthly mortgage payments. As rates rise, your mortgage interest charges also increase, resulting in higher monthly payments. For example, let’s consider …

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Talking Money: Financial milestones of your 30’s, 10th August 2015

On the 10th of August we looked at the ‘financial milestones’ you should have reached by the time you are in your 30’s.

As with many things, these are not ‘set in stone’ but in general, they are good indicators of how you are doing on your road to financial health.

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RTE Talking Money: The cost of raising kids

This week on RTE’s ‘Talking Money’ we looked at the cost of raising a child. Everybody who ever had kids knows it’s expensive, but did they realise it can cost about €105,000 per child? That’s a real eye opener and that so many parents cut back on vital financial needs like life insurance to allow for general consumption is a concern. As always, you’re bound to be entertained as Karl Deeter and Jill Kerby ‘talk money’.

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Buffet on staying out of debt

When one of the best investors the world has ever known says you should stay out of debt it might be worth listening to! We are advocates of keeping debt as low as possible, this involves financial habits and life habits that lead to financial success. Enjoy the video, the words of this video are full of wisdom.

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RTE Drivetime: ‘Talking Money’ Financial Milestones, 23rd March 2015

The idea of ‘financial milestones’ is that at certain times in a persons life they should have achieved certain financial goals. This isn’t materialism, it’s simply a money amount which demonstrates the level of financial sense being instilled in the person, the same as school tests show levels of literacy etc.

Karl Deeter and Jill Kerby went through some that children should have at certain ages and why they are important.

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Talking Money on New Years Resolutions, 5th January 2015

This was our first time to do ‘Talking Money’ on RTE’s Drivetime Show, we looked at financial resolutions, how to make them simple, and most importantly, how to set them up so you actually implement them, the key is to take small steps and form habits rather than trying to do it all at once. Listen in to the clip to find out more!

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The risk of inflation, who do you trust?

I have no doubt that as we keep pushing more and more money into the system to keep the ship afloat that it may prove to be inflationary, but how much and when? We already saw the hawks point towards rising oil and gold prices as evidence but then those commodities have come back from their highs – perhaps there is a degree of speculation at play, or the fundamentals changed as prices rose, it is easy to suppose, difficult to factually nail down.

The idea that inflation is always and everywhere a monetary phenomena is a famous Milton Friedman quote, but there is a difference at play now versus the way things worked in the past in terms of how the timing might work.

When money was ‘real’ (backed by precious metals), debasement had a very immediate effect, and once it became apparent people would take money out of circulation and have it re-minted elsewhere; that is why ‘sterling silver’ has that name, because British sterling was considered to be of a high quality, the …

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The good things about Negative Equity Mortgages (for the banks)

There was a post on Geckko’s World about Negative Equity Loans – and he rightly pointed out that there had been an instant and widespread denouncement of them, then going on to point out that if a person was to try to reduce their debt that it could in fact be a very good concept. My opinion is that the focus will not be as a facility to reduce a persons debt but rather to increase, however, Geckko makes some very interesting and valid points which show that the first reaction was perhaps not totally balanced, as well as giving some smart operational guidelines (it’s worth leaving here for a while to check out the post).

However, there are some distinct advantages for the lender in this process as well which I have not seen any commentary on (if you have please post links in the comment section!).

1: Reduced borrower risk: Surely a higher LTV makes it riskier right? …

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Who has the best mortgage rates?

The ‘best rate’ is a misnomer because interpretation of what is the ‘best’ is a subjective question, for a very conservative person a 10 year fixed rate is ‘the best’ and from that point the ‘best’ will likely be whatever is the cheapest ten year fixed rate, having said that, after careful consideration the best 10 year fixed rate mortgage might be one that allows you to pay off a lump sum during the fixed period without any penalty thereby ensuring that you can eat into your capital quicker, is a feature like that worth extra money each month if it isn’t the cheapest? To some people it may be, to others it isn’t.

If you are considering a property purchase and are not a cash buyer then you will need financing, and this comes at a ‘price’, the interpretation of that price is generally the rate, so which rate is better (we’ll assume you want a 1 year fixed rate), 2.5% or 2.6%? Naturally you’d be inclined to say it is …

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