Competitive Currency Devaluations

I have been talking for some time about a ‘rip off’ that the US will attempt to make against China, that it could take a belligerent form (default) or a traditional and less likely to cause a war option (devaluation of the dollar). It seems to be playing out and going for option two.

Competitive currency devaluations are alive and well in the world, why? Well, in early 09′ I wrote about it on the Paddy Power Trader blog:

“One way of paying bond holders back (but not ‘rewarding’ them) is via a devalued currency with an inflationary environment thrown in, in fact the big robbery of this century is going to be (as it was in the past as per the 1870s first, and then via Presidential Executive Order 6102 in the 1930’s) a dollar based one, the only way the US can pay its debts is to essentially rip off the debt holders, domestically that won’t be so bad, but internationally it …

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Interbank Yield Curve: 28th September 2010

It has been a while since I posted on the yield curve, the main reason was that I lost my daily treasury letter from Bank of Scotland when all of their reporting went back to the UK and the daily replacement by Lloyds didn’t offer sufficient time-line to give a full curve.

The interesting thing that has happened in the interim is that the rules regarding forward rate prices between mortgage rates and Euribor rates has disconnected, in the same way that the ECB and Euribor disconnected in 2007, by this I mean that it is fascinating to see the established relationship end but the implications are horrifying for borrowers because it has meant that their monthly payments have gone up at a time the ECB is keeping rates low for the purpose of loosening up the financial cogs.

Take a look at the difference between February of this year and today, we can see that the long term rates are coming down and that flattening of the curve means two things: the ‘new normal’ is predicted to be one …

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The most important step for preventing future mortgage meltdowns

I have been asked several times ‘what would you change’ in the mortgage market in order to prevent serious financial melt-down in the future, the truth is there is no single thing that will ever do it, our issues are a perplexing intertwining of regulation failure, greed, banking errors, mismanaged risk, fundamental misunderstanding of money markets and national failure. There are key players within this, first and foremost is our government, after that is our central bank/ regulator, and finally financial institutions.

Anyway, the one thing I would change if I could would be the security on asset lending, in a nutshell I would just change one rule, therefore removing the need to revamp the entire system, the rule would mean that asset lending is non-recourse beyond the asset upon which the loan was secured.

In plain English, if you got a mortgage then the only recourse a bank would have wouldn’t be to you (currently you are on the hook for 12yrs and more) it would be to …

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