How has remote working affected rent prices in Ireland?

Because of the pandemic, so many people across Ireland have transitioned to remote work. While reopening is underway, it will still be some time before the majority of the workforce is back in their offices. During the pandemic, many people who lived and worked in major cities like Dublin found themselves returning to their home counties due to the opportunity to work from home. The Residential Tenancies Board (RTB) has found that a trend may be beginning with this movement of people away from urban centers due to covid-19.

Rents have increased across the State in the first three months of 2021 when compared to that same time period from last year. But perhaps as a reflection of people’s shift to remote work, rents have seen their sharpest increases outside of Dublin. During the first three months of the year, rents as a whole have seen a rise of 4.5 percent compared to the first quarter of last year. The nationwide average rent in euros for this quarter comes out to be €1,320, an increase of €33 when compared with …

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Why are investment funds buying up Irish Property?

Large-scale private rented sector (PRS) investors, sometimes called vulture or cuckoo funds, have rapidly become a major force in the Irish property market over the last few years.

As recently as 2017, these funds were a minor and insignificant part of the housing market. However, these firms have spent more than €6 billion buying Irish homes, apartment buildings, and commercial properties over the last three and a half years.

The cuckoo funds show no sign of slowing down in 2021, as they have spent €1.5 billion so far this year, according to recent figures from estate agents and property adviser JLL. Most of these funds are backed by international investors, and have quickly become big players in the market, particularly investing in deals for new apartments in Dublin.

But what is driving this relatively new and rapidly growing force in the market?

Analysts say that an influx of cash in European markets, lack of yields in traditional assets including bonds, and the huge surge in housing demand and high rent prices in Ireland have combined to create a very lucrative …

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Looking to move to Dublin? Consider living in these areas

The city of Dublin is one of the most popular hubs for relocation for people from all over Ireland and the world. Divided into a north and south side by the Liffey River, Dublin has many great neighborhoods within its 24 postal districts. Boasting a population of 1.2 million people, more than 25% of the entire country’s population, Dublin is a busy city packed with a variety of inhabitants and lifestyles. Whatever type of lifestyle you’re looking for, there is a great neighborhood in Dublin that can suit your needs. Here is a brief look at some of the best locations in Dublin.

City Center South

Looking to live a city lifestyle, with great food and diverse nightlife? If so, City Center South may be for you. Though it may be a little more affluent and expensive to live in than its Northern counterpart, North Inner City, or D1, City Center South, known as D2, provides a great experience for those looking to live in a central location with lots of tourist attractions. Nearby attractions include the iconic Temple Bar, …

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The Coronavirus Brought Me To Dublin

As an American student from Boston, Massachusetts studying at Providence College in Rhode Island, I was offered an opportunity to continue my business studies in Shanghai, China. At the time I had to make a decision, the U.S. news reports were filled with articles about escalating trade tensions between the United States and China. Tariffs were followed by retaliation tariffs, back and forth, between both countries and I was nervous the tensions would affect China’s view towards Americans studying in their country. Despite the public tensions, I accepted the opportunity to learn and intern in a large financial hub with a rather booming economy.

As the February 2020 departure was soon approaching, I started to hear fewer and fewer stories about the Trade War, and more and more stories about a rampant epidemic, the Coronavirus. A virus that started in Wuhan had rapidly spread throughout China and even to six individuals in the United States. My concern about how Chinese people would view me altered to a concern of if I could even attend school in China. As the number …

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Wuppertal Geography and Facts

Wuppertal is the biggest city in the nearby area which is called ‘’Bergisches Land’’. With a population of over 354.000 people, the city takes up an area of about 169.000 square km. This makes Wuppertal the seventeenth largest cities in Germany. 

The coordinates of the city are: 51°16′12″ N; 7°10′03″ O.

The Wupper river, where the city gets its name, is a 116km long river that flows through the heart of the city. Wuppertal has several villas dating from the 18th and early 19th century when the city as it is today was founded. There are also more than 4500 protected historic monument buildings within the city. The main feature of the city is the suspension railway system. It is a unique means of transportation, which consists of a train turned completely upside down that runs over the Wupper River. 

Wuppertal is the biggest city in the area, and known for its steep slopes and lush woods and parks. the city is also the greenest city in all of Germany, with two-thirds of the entire municipal area being covered in green. 

The area around …

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Soaring Cost of Living in Ireland

For a lot of people living in Ireland, considering the cost of living never really crosses their mind. They pay rent, buy groceries and live their lives. The price of all of it is just that, the price. For others who haven’t grown up here or have traveled outside the country, the everyday price of living is more prevalent. Compared to most European countries, and many countries around the world, Ireland is a very expensive place to live.

The European Union (EU) has a lot of cheap places to live nevertheless, such as Bulgaria and Poland. In order to find out how cheap or expensive, we look at the Cost of Living Index. Based off of Prague, which is the central reference city, we can statistically see just how expensive certain countries are to live in. Both Bulgaria and Poland received scores hovering around 80. This means its 20% less expensive to live in those two countries than the average in the EU. Ireland and specifically Dublin received a score of 202! This translates to a cost of living 102% …

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Rent prices pierce ceiling

Rent prices, something that seems to always be steadily increasing. In 2016, the Irish government began to take note of a fast moving, upward trend in certain zones and put a price ceiling on rent prices in an effort to regulate these changes. Areas that have a high likelihood to increase rent, specifically because of location and competition, are called Rent Pressure Zones (RPZ). 

These zones are primarily located in the larger cities, such as Dublin, Galway or Cork and have specifications that help to protect renters from exorbitant hikes in monthly prices. Any property within a Rent Pressure Zone are legally not allowed to increase their prices by more than 4pc each year. 

This ceiling in rent increases are intended to create a more affordable market for landlords and tenants so that they can have a good idea of how prices could rise; this is ideal for planning housing opportunities and finances in the future. This program worked for the most part, with many tenants seeing an increase of between 2.4 and 3pc a year from 2016 to 2018. 

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Inflation Rates Return to Normal

 

The current housing prices in Dublin have been talked about extensively recently. The newest trend shows that housing prices have reached peak affordability and now some of the wealthy classes of people are having trouble affording homes. Current house prices in Dublin are more than nine times the average salary making them unattainable for the majority of people because mortgages can only be 3.5 times your salary. Additionally, these numbers have not been seen since the Celtic Tiger Era, however, the central bank has been more careful this time and increased borrowing rules unlike during the Celtic Tiger Era. Prices are now beginning to slow down because simply nobody is able to afford them.

Inflation has also cooled off recently with a decrease from 12.4% last May to 2.8% a year later. Dublin has seen a significantly smaller inflation rate with an increase of prices from the current year to May of .6%.

The region of Dublin had the highest median price of 366,000 Euros which is just over 9 times more than its average salary of 40,000 Euros. …

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Dublin’s Airbnb market faces increasing regulations

As mentioned in previous articles, Dublin and its surrounding areas has been struggling to accommodate every person who is willing and able to purchase a home. Demand has stayed at levels significantly higher than that of supply, causing people all over the area to rethink their current living situations.

Local authorities are looking for possible causes and solutions to this shortage. The first possible factor that the government has decided to more heavily regulate in hopes of amending their housing issue is Airbnb.

Starting July 1, Airbnb lenders will be faced with increased water, insurance and commercial rate charges. Additionally, in areas where there is a high demand for housing there may be a temporary ban on the ability to do short term let outs of a property.

In the future, landlords will be restricted to renting out their properties for only 90 days of the year and will still require the acquisition of commercial planning permission. Furthermore, the bookings will only be allowed to extend up to 2 weeks before termination of stay, and these weeks …

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Regular wages and purchasing homes

In the current market, there is an increasing want and need for housing in Ireland, especially in populated cities such as Dublin. With this increasing demand, prices of homes and rent are rising each year. One problem that many soon-to-be or want-to-be home owners face now is the inability to effectively save for a home when they are paying high rent fees month after month.

The Central Statistics Office of Ireland notes that the average full time worker made around €45,611, while an average part time worker made around €16,600. Using surveys on these two numbers, we can say that the average worker in Dublin makes around €37,000 per year.

These numbers seem to allow a single person to be able to obtain a mortgage and afford a home, but if you were to add into the equation any additional expenses, such as children, rent or transportation, there would be a significant amount of money deducted from those average numbers.

The national average rent in Ireland is €1,122 per month. If you are interesting in living in Dublin, …

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