Falling House Prices in Dublin

According to the Irish Independent, housing prices in Dublin on average are decreasing by just over €1,000 per month. However, property prices in the rest of the state are continuing to rise slowly or remain constant.

Property prices have been determined to have decreased on average of €4,500 in the past quarter of the year. Since the beginning of 2019, property prices in Dublin have fallen by 2.2%. The price of an average home in Dublin is now down to €433,000.

Although the average cost of housing in the capital has decreased, Dublin remains one of the most expensive cities to live in Ireland. On average, properties in the capital cost two to four times more than property in the rest of Ireland. This data was reported from the Irish Independent and the Real Estate Alliance (REA) Average House.

South Dublin has seen the steepest decline in overall average home values. In three months, property prices of South Dublin have fallen by  €6,500. Although progress has been shown in the prices of homes in Dublin, prices are still rising in other counties. Prices of …

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Affordable Home Schemes

With the current housing crisis in the midst of the country, many plans have been developed to get the country out of its current slump. Some merely get laughed at, while others are well on their way to implementation within the housing market. It is likely that before long these effects will take a toll in the market and we will begin to see some upward movement in home buyer confidence.

The government has been quick to release multiple initiatives set out with the goal to turn the crisis around and allow the market to begin looking up. The Home Loan Scheme recently announced by the government is designed with the strategic plan to provide low-cost mortgages to first time home buyers.

With the first announcement of such a plan, many home buyers are thinking; is this too good to be true? As they have been waiting for an extended period of time for some light to be shed on the crisis that allows them to finally move into the homeowner sector.

The Rebuilding Ireland Home Loan …

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TodayFM ‘The Last Word’ features Irish Mortgage Brokers

We were asked to take part in a segment called ‘Home Truths’ on TodayFM during the Last Word with Matt Cooper. The segment featured Karl Deeter and David Silke from the housing agency.

We were discussing the rental market and certain issues that go along with it, our main point is that there shouldn’t be a housing crisis, but that we managed to manufacture one.

The audio clip has the full segment on it.

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Newstalk 106: Pat Kenny talks to Irish Mortgage Brokers

The Pat Kenny show on Newstalk 106FM had Karl Deeter of Irish Mortgage Brokers and Carol Tallon of BuyersBrokers on to discuss the property market in 2016 and to consider some of the things that were happening as well as why certain problems seem to persist.

It was an interesting segment and one that highlighted things such as problems of dereliction.

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Irish Times mention Irish Mortgage Brokers in article about renting

We were quoted in a this piece by Aoife Valentine of the Irish Times which was an interesting article about the situation renters face.

When discussing the rising age of first time buyers she quoted us as we mentioned that “this is something that’s become very obvious to mortgage broker Karl Deeter.

“When I started working in lending in around 2003, people in their 20s were borrowing. Nowadays, your typical applicant is no longer 24 to35, they’re 30 to 40,” he says.

New mortgage lending rules issued by the Central Bank in January say that first-time buyers may borrow only 3-and-a-half times their gross annual income, and they must save a 10 per cent deposit on the first €220,000 of the value of the property and a 20 per cent deposit on any higher value.

Deeter believes these rules are now having an effect on who gets on the property ladder.

“What the deposit rules have done is keep people in the rental sector when they otherwise would have been …

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