Our submission to the Central Bank on CP87 – Mortgage lending caps

We submitted a paper to the Central Bank on the mortgage cap proposal they have put out for consultation. Our view is that apart from being a crude instrument that it doesn’t work, Hong Kong is being used as an ‘example’ when in fact they are the very example that demonstrates best that the policy is misguided.

As practitioners we think a far more nuanced approach with other solutions such as higher stress tests, a freeze on underwriting criteria and mortgage insurance should the lender wish to avail of it are better.

Our submission can be downloaded here.

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Sunday Business Post – Deposits

This story appeared in the print and online edition of the Sunday Business Post on the 9th of June 2013.

Another banking win is how some heralded the  move by the NTMA to drop their savings rates, in some instances these rates reducing by over 40%. The savings products are distributed on an agency basis by An Post, but was it a decision made due to bank pressure and is there anything a saver can do about it?

To start we need to remember that typical deposit rates in normal nations with healthy banks are generally about one percent or less. Our nation is not typical, our banks are still far from healthy, so we have seen elevated rates for the last five years.

At one point in late 2008 early 2009 you could get over 5% on a one year deposit. And although the banks whine about An Post having state backing and great rates they didn’t do this when their members had the best rates during the financial crisis and only existed due to state support, sauce for …

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Capital and interest mortgage, annuity, repayment – defined

There are four main types of loans, these differ in the way the capital is repaid to the lenders.

Capital & Interest, the most popular type of housing loan, where the borrower makes regular repayments – part interest / part capital. These are usually for an agreed term, typically 25 years however in recent times the term can be as long 30 -35 years.

C&I loans are also know as Repayment mortgage, Standard mortgage and Annuity mortgage. In the early years of a C&I loan the majority of the repayment is used repaying the interest, so the capital reduces slowly.

So as the capital reduces with each repayment, so does the amount of interest payable on that capital.

The other types of loans are interest only repayments with the capital sum been paid at the end of the term from, a:An Endowment Mortgage b:A Pension Mortgage c:The sale of the property / asset.

This means that the borrower pays interest only for the term of the agreement and only repays the capital sum at the end by means of a …

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DEAR CLID

This is a useful little acronym in accountancy, you may well learn it when studying financial accounting. It has to do with how you either debit (dr) or credit (cr) an account depending on the type of transaction you are considering.

So ‘DEAR’ stands for ‘Debit any Expense, Asset or Reduction in Liabilities’

and ‘CLID’ stands for ‘Credit any Liability, Income or Decrease in Assets’.

Knowing these will help you make the right choice in nearly all of the journal entries you might make, so if for instance you had a sale for €400 and you put the money in the bank it would be fair to say that

1. the sale is an income (therefore credit ‘sales’) and 2. the cash paid to you is an asset (debit bank or cash).

The idea of placing this money in different named accounts can be tricky once you move beyond a simple cash sale. For instance, if you sold something on credit you would have a ‘trade receivables’ account to debit and you still credit ‘sales’, but only upon payment of …

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We need to clear our bonds, ensure there are retail offerings.

Ireland has been downgraded by Standard and Poors, we are on a ratings watch with Fitch and Moody’s as well. The last bond issued by the NTMA was not subscribed as widely by the international financial community as they were previously and the Irish stepped up and bought up 55% of the bond, we saved the day ourselves. Now we are at a crossroads, we need to raise money, it will be more expensive given our national outlook and at the same time investors are shying away from our sovereign debt, equally we can’t cut back spending enough to bridge the gap and impressing the international investor market with taxation will hurt our national economy.

There is enough money in this country to clear all of the bonds required, and it is held in ready cash format. …

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