Banks or brokers? Which to choose when applying for a mortgage

In applying for a mortgage, there is always the question of whether to go directly to a bank or to go through a broker. There could be advantages and drawbacks to either approach; the former could be faster and/or less expensive, but brokers can provide valuable assistance before and during the application process that make them a viable alternative. Ultimately, which of the two is the better option is based on the individual, and they should consider personal knowledge, experience, and preference when applying.

Firstly, going straight to a bank allows one to avoid paying a broker’s fee. Additionally, there may be an added level of trust associated with conducting negotiations directly. Assuming one has a high credit score, healthy income, and otherwise checks all of the boxes banks are looking for, it could prove to be faster than going through a broker. However, failing to do so might lead to one’s application being rejected out of hand. If an applicant is aware of such complicating factors, they should consider going to a broker instead.

If an applicant isn’t aware …

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How will the rising of State Pension Liabilities affect you?

Recently, state pension liabilities have been on the rise at around 10% annually, according to a recent studying involving Ireland’s pensions, it claims that pension schemes across Ireland have over €600 billion worth of liabilities. The study analyzes are many Irish households were privately owned by employers and the government, finding that the State pension accounts for almost 60% of all liabilities. Within that, the public sector pensions account for nearly a quarter while the private sector pensions are around 16%.

Overall, the pension liabilities within Ireland has increased by 7%, however, there are still differences in the positions of such schemes. The liabilities of private sector schemes has increased at just over 1%, while the public sector schemes have almost increased by 10% for state pension liabilities. One of the biggest issues is the sustainability of the current State pension scheme and whether the age requirement on the scheme will rise to 67 as previously planned, and then to 68 in 2028.

The study in 2018 shows that Ireland’s total pension liability at that time was equal to 186% …

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AIB conforms to Industry Standards in drawing a mortgage

The AIB has implemented regulations that have started to severely lower the time that it allows potential home buyers to look from a new home. This time frame went from 12 months to half of that. The reasoning the AIB has given for this is that it increases the approval in principle.

Two weeks ago, on January 15th, AIB made up of around 33% of the mortgage market. The bank announced that it will no longer allow the individuals who received mortgage approval 12 months ago to draw down their loans. These individuals will instead have to do so within 6 months, which is the normal time frame for most other banks within the market. The change is said to only apply to new applicants and that if you were an individual that applied in the 12-month period before January 15th of this year, the 12-month period will still apply to you.

AIB has previously one of the only banks to offer an extended amount of time for consumers to draw down a mortgage, which was one of its largest …

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Is Renting really a bad thing?

Should you rent or should own it? This may be a controversial topic but let us clear up the misunderstandings and go over the facts.

Some may think, “Isn’t renting just throwing money away in the trash while buying a home you are putting it towards something you will own in the future?” Yes, it is but not for a long time. Many individuals pay their mortgages from 5 years upwards to 20 years or more! The first 5 to 10 months of mortgage mostly interest, meaning you are still throwing that money out the window as well. If you are tight on money already, attempting to own your first home might not be the right time for you. It may be great for some, but it could be a potential burden for others.

Although homes generally appreciate there is always a risk of depreciation due to external factors, like companies moving out of the city causing many residents to move away. If the house …

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Banks in Ireland Expecting to Slow in Recovery

According to a new study done by stockbroking firm Davy, Ireland’s banks can expect to see a slowing in recovery and business activity within the first quarter as the government extends the current lockdown that is Level 5 until foreseeable, March 5th. Even though recently, large banks such as AIB and the Bank of Ireland has reported that in the last quarter of 2020, the lending and other business activities have recovered more than projected from the slump at the start of the quarantine. Still, Davy’s analysts report that they do not expect lenders to book material additional to loan-loss provisions after last year as many of the consumers are looking at these on a case-by-case basis.

The extension of the lockdown and corresponding restrictions are likely to impact the recovery seen in Q3 and Q4 of 20-20, and will likely hit Q1 of 2021, which is seasonally the weakest quarter for new lending in Ireland. House buying will probably require a conservative approach from businesses to limit risk in the new market of loosening restrictions. Individual buyers and businesses …

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The Rich Becoming Richer

In the past year, the term “the rich get richer” has been remarkably accurate. We have seen the top 10 richest individual’s personal wealth increase tremendously and even witnessed Elon Musk become the richest person on earth, passing Warren Buffet on the way. This trend has not been exempted from Ireland’s billionaires. Of the 9 billionaires in Ireland, they have seen their collective wealth increase by €3.28 billion in 2020, despite going through the deepest global recession this decade. And to put that into perspective, 1/10 of that additional wealth would be able to pay for the COVID vaccine to be available to every citizen in Ireland.

Internationally, we are beginning to see a larger divide between the rich and everyone else. This move towards greater inequality has only been highlighted during the pandemic. It is said that the worlds’ one thousand richest people were able to recover from their financial losses due to COVID within nine months, while it will take more than a decade for the world’s poorest countries to do the same. And since the majority of …

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International Tariffs Affecting Ireland Marketplaces

With the switch of the presidency in the US, international trade laws are set to change. The most recent being the increased tariff on import of bread products in Brexit and increased costs. These taxes on flour imports are predicted to raise the price of bread in the area by as much as 9%.

The IBEC group has spoken out about concerns in the food and drink sector, speaking to the impact of these new regulations and the origin of said laws. Vital points they bring up include how the deal in the EU-UK Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) that included this rising tariff for flour products will require a derogation for the Irish bakery sector in order to help with these tariffs. When tariffs like these occur, many buyers typically stockpile products to avoid the extra costs, but the shelf life of flour is generally low, lasting around 2 weeks. Meaning that any price fluctuations and their effects on the market will be seen in a very short amount of time.

The impact of the tariff is likely to …

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What Does the Biden Administration bring to Ireland?

With the inauguration of Joe Biden, an ending of the four years of the highly debated Trump Administration begins. Many people are overjoyed with the change in power, but there is also some doubt. The main focus of Biden, as stated in his inauguration speech is to “restore the soul of America”, but what does that mean and entail for Ireland and our relationship with the US?

The effects of US government policies have long-lasting effects on the Ireland economy. Especially changes in corporate tax code on the US international companies that operate within our borders, employing nearly 160,000 people. These businesses are the case of nearly a €7 billion unforeseen fall of Irish corporation tax receipts over the last half-decade. The Trump administration was a strong advocate for tax reforms aimed to bring said organizations’ operations closer to home in the US. This included nearly a 10.5% charge on global low-taxed income, or otherwise known as the Gilti tax. The Gilti profits tax has been set far too low, and therefore did not discourage US companies to shift their …

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Healthy Relationships with Money and your SO

Lots of people say money complicates things. Well, it may be true in some situations but being transparent about your significant other and money is important. Over the years you will attract what you are worth and what you put out there. How you act to others is a direct effect of how others will view you, this is not only for significant others but friends, family, etc. You worried you are with the wrong person or attracting the wrong people you might need to start reevaluating yourself.

Speak to your partners. Do you like saving money? Do you like investing? Do you like getting good deals? Communication is key. Being on the same page with each other is important to know each other’s values. By doing so, as partners you can start compromising to avoid unsaid annoyances. Letting each other know right from the beginning shows exactly who you are and who they are. It makes it easy to find someone like you or believes in the same things as you.

Money may be a taboo topic. Having conversations …

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Morgan Stanley Borrowing on the Bond Market

The stock market and Trading has been the hot topic of the past decade. Many young individuals look towards buying and trading stocks as the next fast way to make money. But the market is much harder to understand than it seems on the surface.

Morgan Stanley, one of the largest American based investment banks, has recently invested just over 400 million Euros on the bond market to secure against a group of buy-to-let mortgages and owner-occupiers located in Ireland. And of these, some vulture funds were bought not from the banks themselves, but rather from third-party locations such as Lone Star and Cerberus.

Generally, a vulture fund is a type of hedge fund, which is privately owned and operated. They are invested in debt considered to be weak or at default, which is also known as distressed securities. These vulture funds are looking to manage and overturn these debts to draw in a profit. Yet despite the large number of home loans in Ireland that were price-reduced following the most recent crash, vulture funds are seeing a hard time …

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