Highlights from the 2017 Macro-Financial Review

The Central Bank of Ireland published today it’s 2017 Macro-Financial Review. The report gives an overview of the Irish economy and the state of its financial environment. The aim of the report is to help protect the interests of the Bank’s stakeholders, these include: the Irish people, national and international authorities, and other participants in the financial market.

Sharon Donnery, the Central Bank’s deputy governor, introduced the report in a speech this morning. She states that the state of the general economy is improving, but also mentions a few outstanding issues that have the potential to negatively impact the economy’s improvement.

The report notes that much of the uncertainty in the Irish economy is a consequence of Brexit. The depreciation of the sterling against the euro and decreasing consumer spending in the UK has already put a burden on export industries. Uncertainties relating to Brexit may also arise from new trade barriers, trade policies and changes in international taxation.

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What Brexit Means for the Irish Economy: a pro and a con

With UK Prime Minister Theresa May failing to win a majority in elections last week, the fate of Brexit negotiations have become even more up in the air. It is likely that she will be forced to give concessions the opposition, and thus take a softer stance on the terms of Brexit. Despite the specifics of the negotiation still being uncertain, it has become obvious that the Irish Economy will be hurt by declining trade with the UK and will at the same time benefit from the relocation of multinational corporations from the UK to Ireland.

The UK is one of the top destinations for Irish exports. In 2015, 12% of Irish exports went to the UK, valuing at $12.9 billion. However, Brexit will force terms of trade between the UK and Ireland to be re-examined. While Ireland will definitely try it’s best to keep trade with the UK as open as possible, with declining consumer spending in the UK and the falling price of the pound to the euro, Irish goods …

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