‘Plan B’ for arrears

There is a strange situation occurring in the Irish property market, arrears are rising rapidly, stock of repossessed homes is on the increase, and yet the number of repossessions is dropping; there is a contradiction in here somewhere.

Per quarter the number of properties being repossessed is dropping, banks are taking back fewer and fewer houses, this would normally be a sign of prosperity, people with jobs and a stable property market would mean that there would be some equity in the property as people pay down debt and are able to afford their payments, but that isn’t the case, quite the opposite, Irish households are heavily indebted and arrears are rapidly rising.

The largest number of properties being taken back is actually that of voluntary surrender (and abandonment), so there is no ‘repossession’ monster lurking in the Irish market because we have decided that we don’t want it to exist, this will come at a cost as we incrementally strip banks of their ability to enforce mortgage contracts.

The stock of property …

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The end of Commissions?

The FSA (Financial Services Authority) in the UK have said that they are not ruling out a future ban on commissions. In the UK financial advisers work on both fees and commissions, however, there is no mention of how they would hope to balance the competition between broker and direct channels.

Currently there are many consumers who cannot afford fees, in Ireland financial advisers work (in general) without fees, relying on commissions for their incomes.  In Ireland consumers have gotten used to a market where they don’t pay brokers, they enjoy independent advice at no difference in cost to that of going through a direct channel (i.e.: walking into a bank where they cannot give you independent advice).

However, if, in the morning the Financial Regulator followed the lead of the FSA and tried to end commissions it would cause a huge market distortion because peoples attitudes to fees would actually drive them out of …

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