The ‘Crunch’ is nearly over, but what lies in its wake?

The Euribor 3 month money is at 2.822% which means the margin on interbank money is now at 0.322% (the current base rate is 2.5%) over the base. The Credit Crunch by definition is a sudden reduction in the general availability of loans (or credit) or a sudden tightening of the conditions required to obtain a loan from the banks. One of the biggest hallmarks of the whole financial crisis was the disjointed relationship of the Euribor from the ECB.

Traditionally the Euribor (we are talking about the 3 month money generally) trailed the ECB at c. 0.1 to 0.2%, so if the ECB base rate was 4% then the Euribor was (approximately) 4.13% or something like that. In July of 2007 this all changed and margins on interbank lending shot through the roof, to such an extent that literally thousands of loans in Ireland alone turned into negative …

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The 'Crunch' is nearly over, but what lies in its wake?

The Euribor 3 month money is at 2.822% which means the margin on interbank money is now at 0.322% (the current base rate is 2.5%) over the base. The Credit Crunch by definition is a sudden reduction in the general availability of loans (or credit) or a sudden tightening of the conditions required to obtain a loan from the banks. One of the biggest hallmarks of the whole financial crisis was the disjointed relationship of the Euribor from the ECB.

Traditionally the Euribor (we are talking about the 3 month money generally) trailed the ECB at c. 0.1 to 0.2%, so if the ECB base rate was 4% then the Euribor was (approximately) 4.13% or something like that. In July of 2007 this all changed and margins on interbank lending shot through the roof, to such an extent that literally thousands of loans in Ireland alone turned into negative …

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Will Specialist or Sub-Prime lenders be better off?

With the news coming out daily about prime lenders facing higher and higher impairment charges it begs the question of who will do better during a downturn, specialist/sub prime lenders or prime high street banks?

Banks stated that they feel impairments of up to 90 basis points were likely, some have revised this figure higher several times with NIB predicting impairment of upwards of 300 basis points. Sub-prime lenders on the other hand start off with predictions of high impairment and they price and gauge the risk accordingly from the outset. Given that starting point, could it be a case that Irish specialist lenders may come out the other side of the liquidity crisis with an overall book that fares proportionately on margins than other prime lenders?

To answer this question we must first consider margins, with many banks typical margin is from 1% to 1.5% on average, however, with many prime lenders this margin is  lower because of low margin trackers that were a point of heavy competition between …

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Less tax and simple bankruptcy could be the best solution

As we await what is being described as a ‘savage’ budget, it is important to remember some of the ideas being thrown about may appeal prima facie. One disappointing suggestion I heard today was a call for tax bands of 50% (this came from an economics professor too!). In this blog we have said for some time that there are only two solutions to the deficit, firstly taxes must go up, secondly we have to stop spending. However, there is a point at which higher taxation actually reduces the tax take (more on this later in the article)

One thing that we need, in light of what will likely be testing times is to consider the impact of tax changes and also the need for a simplified bankruptcy system. There are currently (so we hear) thousands of well to do ‘non-dom’s’ in the UK who are planning to leave because of changes to the tax system. Ireland is a small …

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Irish Mortgage Lenders, who provides mortgages in Ireland

This post is a brief account of the residential mortgage providers in the Irish mortgage market, a brief look at who they are and what kind of lending they are involved in. Many people have no idea who is who, or who owns who so this should help to clarify some of that. Of course, as a broker we can help guide you through the myriad of lenders and options, but even our expertise is not an adequate replacement

The list of lenders in residential mortgages are (in no particular order)

1. IIB Homeloans 2. Haven 3. PTsb 4. First Active 5. EBS 6. Irish Nationwide 7. ACC Bank 8. Bank of Ireland 9. Springboard 10. Start Mortgages 11. Nua Homeloans 12. GE Money 13. Leeds Building Society 14. Bank of Scotland 15. ICS 16. NIB 17. Ulsterbank 18. AIB

Who they are and what kind of lending do they do?

1. IIB Homeloans: This is ‘Irish Intercontinental Bank’ and they were once owned by Irish Life, they then got bought out by

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The good thing about a Property Bubble

There is so much gloom and doom in the press recently that only those with the greatest fortitude seem to find any cause for happiness. Personally I have been talked down off the roof a few times already (philosophically not in reality). And hardly a day passes where the Government don’t give us some negative outlook news. If you are into sadomasochism there is a new way to get your kicks, it’s called the ISEQ and if you are truly sick you can always watch property prices.

However, today’s article is going to focus on the good life and the good things that are coming out of the property bubble and that will continue to serve us all better in the future (catastrophic losses aside)

1. The Bubble performed where the Government and Good Intentions failed: The Government and all of the good intentions in the world were never able to gentrify the north inner city (my former home), but the property bubble did a GREAT job! Walking down Sean McDermott Street or Gardiner Street after dark is no longer …

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Mortgages in Ireland, a little bit about mortgage brokers.

Just a quick note to readers, Irish Mortgage Brokers is an intermediary, we go between you and the bank to arrange finance. You can go direct yourself and get the same mortgage, however, over half of the market uses and intermediary to arrange their finance, this is normally because they don’t really how to get a mortgage in Ireland or because they find using a broker easier than dealing with the job directly. And some people just prefer the personal touch of a broker over that of call centres and branches.

If you want to find the best Irish mortgage rates you can do so in a simple phone call or online application, click on the ‘home’ button above and apply over the web or call us on 01 6790990 and an agent will be able to assist you. The people we tend to work with are clients looking for a First Time mortgage in Ireland, people who want to find out how to remortgage a property, commercial lending, and trading up/down.

We are regulated by the Financial Regulator as …

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What next lenders?

Here are some ideas about where we feel banks will go next in terms of the lending market, these are only opinions, whether or not we see any of this coming to fruition can only be told by time.

1. Early Redemption Bonus: Early redemption means ‘paying off your mortgage early’, in fact when you switch your loan this is what happens, or when you clear it entirely. Why would a bank offer you a cash bonus for actually moving your loan away from them though? Or for paying it off? Isn’t the idea that you pay lots of interest?

Actually that’s a mixed answer, normally it would be ‘yes’, banks want you to keep paying interest over time, but now we are seeing a few things that we have not seen before. Firstly are negative margin loans, if you have a tracker of anything less than ECB + 1.5% (ish) then the likelihood is that the bank is not making any money on your loan after their operational cost, therefore it may be worthwhile to give you a monetary …

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Save or get a mortgage?

The current market probably confounds many consumers, should you be saving in order to have a bigger deposit in the belief that the property market has bottomed out? Or do you buy now in the belief that the market has bottomed out and that any potential equity loss is worthwhile?

I met with an economist yesterday who shall remain nameless, but he made an excellent point, if you are buying a house to stay in yourself then really what you are doing is giving up future earnings in order to obtain an asset today, if that asset price goes down then it means that potentially you sacrificed a portion of your future earnings that you didn’t have to but most importantly it was all based on future earnings, and because that is somewhere down the line it was not really a ‘loss making’ proposition. This guy was and is a property bear but primarily on the investor side. It was an interesting point of view and one that I had not really considered in the past.

As a mortgage broker …

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Euribor, the distant cousin of the ECB base rate

We have written in the past about tracker mortgages becoming an endangered species. It seems that now we are witnessing the demise of them, the interbank rates and the ECB have become so disparate to each other that one is no longer an accurate gauge of the other. What does that mean?

The ECB is the rate set by the European Central Bank, and it is the ‘base rate’ (currently 4.25%), but banks can’t generally borrow at that price and instead they buy on the ‘interbank‘ market, this is the largest market in the world in which over 1.9 Trillion is traded every single day! It is how banks access the ‘Euribor‘ market (European interbank offered rate). This is basically run as an auction and because liquidity is an issue we have seen the prices of the Euribor rise and rise, demand is outstripping supply.

Why is the Euribor rising? Simply put, fractional banking means that banks must have a constant inflow of money …

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