Soon to see more regulation among housing

In reference to Greater regulation of our building standards would make it easier to fund social housing by Charles Barry on 26 June 2017 in Independent.

The house building of Ireland is continuing to rise but not without trouble. High demand means there is a chance builders are only looking at their output volume and not the quality. This led to numerous issues that have came up in late 90s and early 2000s – breaking health and safety regulations, pyrite, poor building quality, and contractor bankruptcy.

Regulations have since come up to avoid these issues with Building Control Amendment Regulations and Construction Industry Register Ireland. Even with these regulations in place, it can not completely solve the problem.

There is a similar situation in the UK with about the same building laws. A recent study found that 66 percent of the underlying issues of buildings are caused by poor workmanship.

To help alleviate this issue, the Dáil approved a motion to improve regulation for buildings. It improves the standard and quality as well as support to homeowners …

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Help-to-buy incentive under scrutiny

This past Sunday, current Housing Minister Eoghan Murphy said on RTE’s The Week in Politics that the Help-to-Buy initiative introduced by his predecessor is currently under review. Since its introduction in January under former Finance Minister Michael Noonan and former Housing Minister Simon Coveney, the Help-to-Buy initiative has already received nearly 7,000 applicants and has successfully helped a great percentage of them with the purchase or building of their first home. However, the initiative has recently come under fire for exacerbating the problems it intended to solve, and there is speculation that it may be dissolved.

 

The purpose of the Help-to-Buy incentive was to encourage first buyers to enter the market by helping applicants with their deposit through the refund of applicants’ income tax and DIRT other the past 4 years. It applies to first time buyers who either purchase or build new residential properties, and allows them to receive 5% of the purchase price of their new home, with an upward limit of €20,000. It is hoped that the incentive would help more people climb the property ladder, …

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Should we enforce more regulations for the housing market?

In reference to Michael O’Flynn backs tax on those hoarding development land by

Ciarán Hancock on June 21, 2017 in the Irish Times.

Michael O’Flynn, a property developer, gives support to a tax to those who are hoarding land and waiting until the housing prices increase. This tax has to be carefully composed in order to avoid taxing those who can’t build because of issues surrounding planning, lack of infrastructure, or zoning. This would be difficult to police and enforce due to fraud or proof of these issues.

O’Flynn also suggested the government to create a government separate entity to help coordinate the planning and zoning issues as well as manage infrastructure spending. This is so the two processes can better work together and help combat the housing issue.

If the government will reduce the VAT 4.5% from 13.5% to 9%, Michael O’Flynn …

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The mortgage market for returning expats

The government has pushed hard in recent years to bring professional workers back into Ireland, welcoming plenty of new construction and dozens of foreign tech companies into the docklands. With many talented workers finding jobs elsewhere in the EU and in countries such as USA and Australia in the aftermath of the financial crisis, it is essential to Ireland’s future as a highly advanced and modern nation that its own professional workforce be well employed at home. Well government initiatives have already seen great success, many returning expats are faced with various complications when attempting to bring their families back home. Amongst these complications is the difficult process these Irish citizens have to go through to get mortgages.

 

Expats currently working and paying tax in another country are considered non-residents. Thus in the books of most major lenders, they are segregated from all other Irish citizens and placed into similar categories as foreign nationals. Thus, returning expats face stricter limits on income and on Loan to Value ratios when apply for …

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Mortgage Market Update

The Financial Broker gives readers an overview on currently property prices and mortgage market conditions.

The Central Statistics Office published a report showing price inflation on property had increased 10.7% in the past year up to February. A similar report reveal how the number of newly build housing last year was 14,932 units when estimates denote a demand of up to 50,000 units. These numbers illustrate a problem in the current mortgage market, which this article pinpoints the causes of. The author laments about rising property prices, arguing that many potential home buyers have missed out on the prime time to purchase property, and are currently no long capable of affording the housing of their choice at an acceptable price.

The author attributes the current housing price and rent inflation in Ireland as consequences of a lack of supply in urban areas instead of lax macro-prudential regulations. In fact, she argues that current Central Bank regulations are too restrictive, and thus have prevented demanders from being able to locate and buy affordable housing. While the prudential regulations have lowered the …

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ECB Putting Pressure on Irish Banks?

European Central Bank is putting pressure on Ireland’s main banks to deal with the non-performing mortgages on their books. The banks are coming up with ways to remove these non-performing loans off their balance sheets. Considering the possibility of special purpose vehicles (SPV) that package all of the non-performing loans. They will need to sell the majority of the stake of the SPV to investors for them to remove it from their books. By creating SPVs, banks will still be able to service and have a stake in the mortgages. They are starting to create leads on investors currently.

With the ECB already overseeing a lot of the main banks in Ireland in the end of 2014, they have cut their average of 27% of non-performing loans off their balance sheet in 2013 to 14% at the end of 2016.

In the recent years, US private equity firms have refinanced millions of non-performing loans from Irish lenders. Showing a demand for such bonds because of the great success of residential mortgage backed securitisation. The banks will need to structure any …

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A response to: Housing for homes – a classic case of market failure

A recent blog post published by Tom Healy, director of the Nevin Economic Research Institute, suggested that the current housing market in Ireland is an example of a failed market. Healy believes that the issue of under supply of housing can only be solved if the government expands provisions of social housing and extends its jurisdictions over prices and supply in the housing market.

Healy based his argument upon the assumption that the current housing market has failed and is unable to recover without intervention. He cites a chronic under supply of housing and the inability of government programs to sufficiently meet demand. While there is indeed a under supply of housing and rising prices due to pent up demand, a series of government construction plans such as the 2013 Forfas Strategy, Capital Investment Plan, and Action Plan for Housing and the Homeless, in addition to private investments are expected to dramatically increase housing supply within the next few years. These projects directly address the supply issue by promising 47,000 additional units of social housing before 2021.

The blog post …

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How Do American Mortgages Work? Part 6: The Federal Agencies

Since the housing market is so massive in the United States the government had to be regulating the market in some way. With some agencies created in the midst of the Great Depression and some after the housing bubble burst. These three primary agencies are there to help the consumer and the lender whether it’s regulating the market or insuring less risk onto the lenders, they are there to provide an efficient mortgage market in America.

After the housing bubble burst, the United States government wanted to make sure nothing of this severity ever happened again. President Obama and the Congress signed in the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act in July 2010 that created the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB). The goal of the organisation is to watch out for American consumers in the market for consumer financial products and services. Since this agency was only focused on the consumer rather than on monetary policy or bank safety, it puts all the agencies focus on protecting the consumer from unfair processes and illegal activity from products and …

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Could Monetary Policy be affecting the Mortgage Default Rate?

With reference to How does monetary policy pass-through affect mortgage default? Evidence from the Irish mortgage market by David Byrne, Robert Kelly, and Conor O’Toole. 04/RT/2017

With the loosening structure of the monetary policy by central banks after the global financial crisis, which allowed the mortgage interest rates to be lower which could have led to a lower default rate on mortgages. This post will focus on two different types of mortgages the Standard Variable Rate mortgage (most commonly known as SVR) and the Tracker mortgage.

A SVR is a mortgage where the lender has the ability to decide when and if the interest rate on the loan will change while a Tracker mortgage is where the interest rate is set to a certain percentage above the European Central Bank interest rate. As the number of Tracker mortgages were increasing while the European Central Bank interest rate was decreasing, the banks started to lose money on them as the interest rate on the mortgage payments were not high enough to cover the cost of the loan. …

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Independent.ie mention Irish Mortgage Brokers

We were mentioned in the Independent today in a story relating to the Central Bank, it hinged upon the fact that they had a ‘whistleblower’ line for people wanting to report financial wrongdoing and it wasn’t operating correctly which means they couldn’t take a call.

The story quoted us as follows: Compliance officer with Irish Mortgage Brokers Karl Deeter said it was not good enough that the whistleblower phone line was not being answered and emails not getting a response.

“Imagine if you called 999 to report a crime and no one answered. What would you think of our police service?” he said. A Central Bank spokesman claimed the problem had been rectified after the situation was raised with it by the Irish Independent.

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