Ireland is Searching for Additional Construction Workers to Solve Housing Shortage

Ireland has a population growth of more than five times compared to the EU average. In the year 2017, Ireland’s population rose by 1.1% per annum, a lot larger than the average for the EU of .2%. Additionally, Ireland had the highest birth rate of any EU member with 12.9 births per 1000 people.

A growing population is great for the economy; however, it causes additional problems as well. One of these problems is a major housing shortage, especially within the more densely populated cities, like Dublin.

One of the roadblocks that Ireland faces with improving the housing shortage is the lack of construction workers. At the current rate, it will be nearly impossible to keep up with the growing population in densely populated Irish cities. Attracting construction workers from abroad could be a short-term fix and become long-term. Additionally, an increase in construction workers would stabilize pay and lower costs for construction companies. Professor Alan Ahearne, Director of Whitaker Institute and Professor of Economics at the National University of Ireland, is worried that a large influx of workers would …

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Regular wages and purchasing homes

In the current market, there is an increasing want and need for housing in Ireland, especially in populated cities such as Dublin. With this increasing demand, prices of homes and rent are rising each year. One problem that many soon-to-be or want-to-be home owners face now is the inability to effectively save for a home when they are paying high rent fees month after month.

The Central Statistics Office of Ireland notes that the average full time worker made around €45,611, while an average part time worker made around €16,600. Using surveys on these two numbers, we can say that the average worker in Dublin makes around €37,000 per year.

These numbers seem to allow a single person to be able to obtain a mortgage and afford a home, but if you were to add into the equation any additional expenses, such as children, rent or transportation, there would be a significant amount of money deducted from those average numbers.

The national average rent in Ireland is €1,122 per month. If you are interesting in living in Dublin, …

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Brexit takes more than just UK funds

As we are all well aware of by now, Brexit may affect the Irish economy. Although, one key part of the economy that we tend to overlook when it comes to this massive change is construction, which can and does play a significant role in our day-to-day life decisions.

Construction is much more intricate than just having laborers come in, swing around some tools, and build a structure. Specifics in supply and demand of laborers, resources, time, materials, consumers, money and a multitude of others aspects all play a part in construction outputs.

If Brexit is to occur, especially a no deal Brexit, there are a number of barriers that can arise. These barriers can and will be placed on construction companies, especially those currently working on a project. Some of these barriers include a reduced labor force, slower materials delivery, and possible construction penalties.

What current construction workers point out is that there is a steady decline in the amount of workers each year, and an even steadier decline in quality construction workers. If a hard …

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Expanding Housing & Development: New Sites

Three new building sites have become available for development. As of early this week, Savills brought three properties to the market that will allow for development. The properties are located near Citywest Business Campus in Dublin, Kilkenny, and north Dublin.

The Citywest property is listed on the market for the price of €5.6 million. The site has been defined as 9.7 acres amounting to a little more than €1.7 million per acre. The property is also available at €3.25 million for one 5 acre plot or 4.7 acre plot. The objective of this property was defined as to “to provide for enterprise and employment-related uses”. This new property listing can be greatly beneficial for Dublin. Introducing a 10 acre plot can be developed and create new jobs and housing.

The second property in North Dublin that has been listed at a starting price of about of €2 million. This lot amount to about three acres. The price per acre is about €1.5 million. The property has planning permission to develop 35 residential units, and may have potential for an additional five homes …

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Cuckoo Funds

Cuckoo Funds has been recently used to describe big investors. Some of the main investors that comprise of the cuckoo funds are large institutional investors like pension funds, real estate investment trusts (REITs) and special private rental firms. These investors pour money into developments that cannot be purchased by the average individual or family. The developments funded by “cuckoo funds” are classified as build-to-rent. Investors are increasingly interested in attempting to tap into the growing demand for Irelands rental market.

These cuckoo funds are named accordingly because they have been seen to push first time buyers out of the market. Cuckoo funds have had significant impacts on investors and buyers in the market.

Benefits to the large investors can be defined by the ability to build apartments that do not have restrictions on maximum number of apartments per floor. Another benefit for a developer willing to invest in build to rent is that they are allowed flexibility in comparison to other developments in regard to amenities and storage. These cuckoo funds are also seen as controversial due to favorable …

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How to design a wealth tax.

Wealth taxes are very popular in general, but not in particular because it usually means that asset ownership gives rise to taxation. One example of this would be property tax.

If ‘wealth’ is going to be taxed it has to be defined, the classical example is to use the accounting equation in which ‘assets minus liabilities equals capital’. The issue after that is where debt is involved because if you owned a home worth €300,000 and had debts on it of €200,000 then your ‘wealth’ is €100,000.

People could potentially try to game the system, it’s not as simple as getting indebted, if you had €300,000 in cash and then bought a property and remortgaged it to the hilt you’d still have to have €300,000 cash somewhere, so the issue becomes one of reporting and valuation.

This puts a weight upon the individual to make declarations and returns which people don’t like doing so a simplified process would be a good thing, where a person can provider a simple number of ‘assets minus liabilities equals wealth’ and file it online.

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RTE Primetime featurs Irish Mortgage Brokers

We were asked to take part in an interview on Primetime about house prices and whether or not they were starting to show signs of falling. Our view is that they will fall in time (probably in a damaging way) but that it won’t be soon because supply is still above demand and price indicators like rents are still rising. This is damaging for first time buyers and those stuck paying high rents.

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RTE Today with Sean O’Rourke has Irish Mortgage Brokers discussing cash buyers

The Today Show with Sean O’Rourke had us on to discuss an article written by Charlie Weston in the Indpendent about the strong level of cash buyers in the Irish property market. Marie Sherlock from Siptu the trade union was also on, what followed was a robust conversation where there was some interesting debate but also a lot of agreement on the problems, symptoms and solutions to the ills of the Irish property market.

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The Tonight Show on VMT, 14th January 2019

We were pleased to see our points about property tax on the Tonight Show on VMT given time to get worked through. The full show is available online at Virgin Media.

"If your income went up 100% would you want more tax money? Of course you would. So stop being hypocrites." – @karldeeter disusses property tax and asset millionaires. #TonightVMT

The Tonight Show, Monday to Thursday at 11pm on Virgin Media One. pic.twitter.com/Cl2cYxpxXW

— The Tonight Show (@TonightVMTV) January 15, 2019

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