Pros and cons of a variable rate mortgage

A variable rate mortgage is a mortgage in which the interest rate on the outstanding balance changes periodically. Typically, these loans will have fixed, or “teaser” interest rates for a specified amount of time, after which the interest rate will change based on a variety of factors. In most cases, the initial interest rate on a variable rate loan will be lower than a fixed rate, which can be appealing for homebuyers. But it is important to be aware of the pros and cons before jumping into a variable rate loan.

Pros

Flexibility

The number one advantage of a variable rate mortgage is flexibility. With a variable rate mortgage, you don’t need to worry about penalties for things like increasing your monthly payment, or paying off your mortgage early. You also have the ability to make lump-sum payments on your mortgage throughout the year, which can be very helpful for home buyers with a fluctuating income affected by bonuses or commissions. If your life is likely to change relatively soon, and you plan on eventually moving or selling the house, …

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First Time Buyers lead the way as mortgage drawdowns and approvals continue to rise

As the Irish economy continues to reopen following the shock of the Covid-19 pandemic, mortgage approvals and drawdowns have remained on the rise. Recent figures from the Banking and Payments Federation Ireland (BPFI) has shown data on mortgage drawdowns and approvals for the second quarter of 2021.

According to the data from BPFI, some 9,625 new mortgages were drawn down in the second quarter of 2021. This represents an increase of 45.4 percent in volume when compared to the same data from the second quarter of 2020, when the pandemic was at its height. These new mortgages have a total value of €2.23 billion, representing an increase in value of 52.5 percent when compared with the same period a year ago. BPFI reports that of these new mortgages, first time buyers represent the largest segment, accounting for some 50.9 percent of all new mortgages.

The vast majority of new mortgages drawn down were to finance a purchase of a home. In the second quarter, there were 7,438 mortgage drawdowns for purchases, with a combined value totaling €1.8 billion, a 47.8 …

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How do mortgages work?

If you’re looking to buy a home, you’ve probably already realized that this is not like most transactions. The average house price in Dublin is €396,000, and unless you’re very wealthy, you probably don’t have anywhere that much in savings. Because you likely can’t afford an expense of this magnitude out of your own pocket, you will need to finance the purchase through a mortgage, and if you’re new to the home-buying process, you may be a little confused as to how exactly these loans work.

A mortgage is a huge loan secured against the value of your house. A “secured” loan means that the borrower promises collateral to the lender in the event that they are unable to make payments, and in this case, the collateral is your home. In other words, the bank will kick you out and take possession of your house if you can’t make payments. In order to prevent this from happening, the lender will typically conduct a detailed review of the borrower’s finances in order to determine how much they can reasonably afford to …

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Buying a home vs. Renting: Which is better?

Buying your home is one of the biggest financial decisions of your life. However, it is a big commitment and there are a lot of hidden costs and factors that can make it unaffordable for some. Because of the costliness of buying a home outright, many buyers turn to renting instead, especially in expensive housing markets like London, New York, and Hong Kong. Determining which option is best for you depends on a variety of factors, and not everyone’s situation is alike. To help with this important decision, let’s take a look at some of the key differences between buying and renting.

Buying

When buying a house, it’s likely you’ll need to apply for a mortgage. To get a mortgage, you need a deposit (usually at least 10% of the home’s value) and a steady income in order to make repayments. The greater your deposit and income, the more your bank or lender will be able to offer you. However, if you live in an expensive area, or have a low salary and little savings, buying may not be for …

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What is an Equity Release and how does it work?

Your equity in your home is how much you own. Think of it as the amount of your mortgage that you have already paid off, or the difference between your home’s market value and what you still owe the lender. So, once you have paid off your mortgage completely, you have 100% equity: you own it entirely. But as the value of your home appreciates, there is no immediate benefit to you in terms of cash. You will not be able to profit from the increase in value until you sell your property, and if you never sell, your estate and beneficiaries will be the only ones who are better off.

An equity release mortgage offers a way around this. These mortgages are becoming increasingly popular for homeowners aged 55 and older, as they give you a way to benefit from the equity you have built up in your home. An equity release involves a lender giving you a portion of the value of your home as a lump sum or a series of payments, in exchange for interest or …

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New Green mortgage offering one of Ireland’s lowest rates

AIB’s mortgage subsidiary Haven has launched a new, four-year, fixed rate green mortgage with one of the lowest rates currently available on the market.

Haven is a wholly-owned subsidiary of AIB which focuses solely on mortgage distribution through brokers. They offer a broad selection of fixed and variable rate mortgages to customers including first time buyers, movers, switchers, and investors.

The mortgage has a rate of 2.15 percent, and applies to both new and existing customers with a Building Energy Rating (BER) of between A1 and B3. The BER cert must also be less than 10 years old in order to be eligible. All new builds are expected to qualify for the low rate, and existing customers who remodel their home to meet the BER requirements will also qualify.

According to AIB, this low rate could result in substantial savings for the average customer. The lender reports that the new rate allows customers of a 25 year, €300,000 mortgage to save €155 monthly. This equates to a savings of €1,800 per year over the lifetime of the loan, when compared …

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What Types of Mortgages are Available in Ireland?

A mortgage is a type of debt that is secured by real estate. In default payments, the borrower is responsible for repaying the debt. The primary reason for obtaining a mortgage is to purchase a property that cannot be paid in total upfront for an individual in Ireland who cannot afford to pay in cash. The COVID-19 pandemic has shown that financing a mortgage in the modern era of the economic downturn may be more complex and complicated than previously anticipated. In addition to limiting the guidelines, creditors and lending companies appear to pick and choose which people’s lives will improve.

Types Mortgages Available in Ireland

Fixed-Rate Mortgage: It is a type of mortgage with a fixed rate for the loan duration, allowing buyers to estimate the cost of a large purchase while making smaller, more predictable payments over time. Reverse Mortgage: It is a type of mortgage loan that allows the borrower to access the property’s unencumbered value through residential property. Typically, older homeowners are targeted for these loans, which do not require monthly mortgage payments. A reverse …

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Is Cryptocurrency a Good or Bad Investment for Mortgage in Ireland?

Since the onset of the Covid-19 pandemic, the world has seen a significant evolution in trade, transaction, and financing. Digital currency is one of the new things in the market and has gained local and global attention. As economic uncertainty spread during the pandemic, the world’s most famous digital currency value increased by more than 500 percent. Bitcoin prices skyrocketed in late 2020, and crypto-currencies are here to stay, but proper regulation is required to take them seriously. Whether Bitcoin is the best get-rich-quick scheme in town or the next financial bubble to burst is usually a matter of opinion, but investors were sweating this quarter. Bitcoin’s value has steadily risen to $1 trillion, making Cryptocurrency a viable investment tool that hedge funds and banks have steadily embraced in recent weeks.

Because of its popularity, many experts have questioned whether Cryptocurrency is a good or bad investment to pair with a mortgage. I agree that it’s a good business venture, but I’d proceed with caution because of the following:

Lack of bank support

Cryptocurrency does not depend on …

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Why are investment funds buying up Irish Property?

Large-scale private rented sector (PRS) investors, sometimes called vulture or cuckoo funds, have rapidly become a major force in the Irish property market over the last few years.

As recently as 2017, these funds were a minor and insignificant part of the housing market. However, these firms have spent more than €6 billion buying Irish homes, apartment buildings, and commercial properties over the last three and a half years.

The cuckoo funds show no sign of slowing down in 2021, as they have spent €1.5 billion so far this year, according to recent figures from estate agents and property adviser JLL. Most of these funds are backed by international investors, and have quickly become big players in the market, particularly investing in deals for new apartments in Dublin.

But what is driving this relatively new and rapidly growing force in the market?

Analysts say that an influx of cash in European markets, lack of yields in traditional assets including bonds, and the huge surge in housing demand and high rent prices in Ireland have combined to create a very lucrative …

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What is the Difference between Mortgage in Ireland and Other Nations in Europe?

Buying a house is always a person dream as compared to renting a room to live in. All countries have different mortgage structure that favors both investors and people that desire to buy or invest in real estate. When comparing the mortgage in Ireland to other European counties, many often say that it is expensive to pay the rates in Ireland than in well developed countries like France and Britain.

When making comparison, it should be noted that mortgage rates in some countries are lower due to their financial stability and the creditworthiness of their creditors. Other factors that affect mortgage rates include bond markets, monetary policies, economic growth, inflation, and the general state of the property market. Market prices tend to rise as they become more stable.

To start with, the reason many experts think that mortgage finance is higher in Ireland is because by international standards, Ireland has a shockingly low level of home possessions. In most European countries, if a loan goes bad, the bank will take possession of the property within a year, which obviously …

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