PRA warns against 35 year mortgages in England

Traditionally, banks have offered mortgage terms of 25 years to buyers, a long enough time so that buyers can have both low monthly payments and a moderate level of total interest paid. In recent years however, there has been a trend towards mortgage loans of even longer terms, those 35 years or longer in the UK mortgage market. By extending the duration of loans, banks have reduced the amount borrowers pay as monthly instalments, thus making housing appear more affordable in the short run. Despite its apparent benefits however, the Prudential Regulation Authority (PRA) of the Bank of England has issued warnings about these loans and their risks and consequences.

 

Earlier this week, in a speech intended to be delivered in May but pushed back due to the election, head of the PRA, Sam Woods warned lenders about offering long term mortgages. With mortgages of over 35 years, there is an increase likelihood that the later instalments would have to be paid with post retirement income. Woods and the agency believes that this dramatically increases the risk of these …

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Shadow mortgage lending in Hong Kong

Property prices have been booming in Hong Kong over the past couple of years, and have yet to reflect any slowdown. While various governmental regulations have attempted to curb growth, a closer look at Hong Kong’s mortgage market reveals that shadow lenders are rapidly gaining ground. These mortgage lenders operate outside of financial regulations and have become the option of many buyers as more limits are placed by the Central Bank on traditional forms of financing.

 

Shadow lending describes private lending performed by institutions that are not tradition banks. These institutions can be financial intermediaries or other lenders and provide similar services as banks. These institutions do not necessarily create instability in the financial system, and can be greatly beneficial by offering financing to buyers in a time where restrictions on tradition banks are tight. However, these institutions lie outside the control of official regulatory institutions, thus their lending practices may be at greater risk if a financial downturn were to happen.

 

In most countries, the major of home loans are still made out by traditional banks, and …

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Mortgage lending gets tougher in Canada

The Canadian housing market has been growing rapidly in the past few years. Currently, many experts fear that home in cities like Toronto and Montreal are greatly overvalued, a reflection on the general instability in the Canadian economy. While Bank of Canada has yet to announce its well anticipated interest rate hike that will curb the rapidly rising house prices, lenders have already begun tightening lending rules and raising mortgage rates.

 

Early this month, major lenders Bank of Montreal, CIBC and Royal Bank of Canada have all raised rates on various types of fixed rate mortgages. Both Bank of Montreal and Royal Bank of Canada raised mortgage rates by 0.2% and rates at CIBC raised by 0.05%. The higher rates of lending is thought to precede Bank of Canada’s anticipated rate hike, which may come as soon as tomorrow.

 

Accompanying the higher mortgage rates is a series of other lending restrictions put in place by Canada’s banking regulator, The Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions …

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Mortgage update on the UK: First-time buyers average deposit is rising

In the UK, the average price for their first-home has hit a record high at £207,693. As well as nearly half of all buyers of homes are first-time buyers. Within the first six months of 2017, the number of first-time buyers are at 162,704. This is only 15 percent below the peak of 2006.

On average £33,000 are needed for deposits for first-time buyers.

London we see even worse housing increases at an average deposit for first-time buyers at £106,577.

Northern Ireland is hitting the lowest spot at an average of £16,457 of deposits, Wales at £17,193, and Scotland £21,565.

Like our Help-to-Buy scheme in Ireland with tax rebates of up to 20,000 euro, the UK has a program similar. Their Help-to-Buy scheme with the low mortgage rates gave first-time buyers a push to buy. That could …

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Mortgage approval rates are surging

The amount of mortgages approvals increased by a third last month. The vast majority was first-time buyers.

With mortgage approval rates increasing, we can expect property prices to keep rising.

The Banking and Payments Federation figures also showed the amount of the approvals is increasing.

A reason for rapid increase could be from Eoghan Murphy, the Housing Minister, reviewing the Help-to-Buy scheme. This review is a result of the Help-to-Buy scheme being accused of inflating house prices.

The increase of approvals does not mean an increase in mortgage drawdowns, as finding a home increases in difficulty. With the housing shortage, houses for sale have multiple offers so you have to outbid the others.

Forecasts predict mortgage lending to go up from €5.7 billion last year to €7.5 billion this year. Within the next three years it might even reach €13 billion.

Mortgage approvals were up from 3,046 last May to 4,124 this May. That makes a 35 percent increase in a year.

We can expect to see an increase of competition among mortgage lending banks with lower interest rates or …

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Mortgage market update: lenders have large margins

Dan White authored a piece published in the Irish Independent on June 18 titled: Are greedy mortgage lenders about to see enormous margins squeezed? The article analyses the current mortgage market and concludes that limited competition between lenders is a source of high interest rates in the market and the consequently high margins and profits achieved by lenders. White takes note of current changes in bank’s interest rates and of a paper published by the Competition and Consumer Protection Commission to predict the future of interest rates and margins in the mortgage market.

 

The author cites a paper published by The Competition and Consumer Protection Commission stating that the Irish mortgage market is “characterised by a high concentration of a small number of lenders, limited competition between these lenders and low levels of entry by new players”. This is in part due to the fact that many foreign lenders left the Irish market after the crash. Because of the limited competition, Irish banks had free range to dramatically increase their net …

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The mortgage market for returning expats

The government has pushed hard in recent years to bring professional workers back into Ireland, welcoming plenty of new construction and dozens of foreign tech companies into the docklands. With many talented workers finding jobs elsewhere in the EU and in countries such as USA and Australia in the aftermath of the financial crisis, it is essential to Ireland’s future as a highly advanced and modern nation that its own professional workforce be well employed at home. Well government initiatives have already seen great success, many returning expats are faced with various complications when attempting to bring their families back home. Amongst these complications is the difficult process these Irish citizens have to go through to get mortgages.

 

Expats currently working and paying tax in another country are considered non-residents. Thus in the books of most major lenders, they are segregated from all other Irish citizens and placed into similar categories as foreign nationals. Thus, returning expats face stricter limits on income and on Loan to Value ratios when apply for …

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Tensions are High in the Mortgage Market

This post is in reference to It’s time to shout ‘stop’ on excessive charges by Brendan Burgess and Banks warned over cashback mortgage deals by Donal O’Donovan. Both published on June 16 2017 in the Independent.

Interest rates are high for non-tracker mortgages and banks are offering cashback deals to manipulate customers.

Everyone is accusing everyone today in the mortgage market in Ireland with interest rates the highest in the European Union. The Competition and Consumer Protections Commission (CCPC) have sat idly by for the past years as the interest rates are rising when the CCPC is designed and paid by the taxpayer to protect the consumers. CCPC came out with a report yesterday stating Ireland needs more competition, long-term strategy, vision and more committees. No suggestions in the report have a solution for the short-term.

The Government, Central Bank, and the CCPC wants everyone to be patient and the competition with drive down mortgage rate… but how long from now? Government and the Central Bank have been saying this for the past three years and nothing has changed.

Now …

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Karl Deeter Mentioned in the Press

You can find an article at this link which mentions Karl Deeter, apart of Irish Mortgage Brokers – Bank accused of ‘gouging’ loyal customers cuts its fixed rates on June 15 2017. Article by Charlie Weston in the Independent.

Permanent TSB, a state-rescued bank, has been increasingly cutting fixed rates in response to being accused of manipulating their clients. The bank has lowered it’s two-year fixed mortgages from 7.25% to 4.20% and three-year fixed mortgages from 8.75% to 4.20%. They have almost halved both of their fixed rate mortgages but the variable rate at the bank has remained the same.

The Central Bank has noticed an increase of fixed variable rates compared to variable for both new borrowers and existing ones. Therefore, banks have been reducing fixed rates to increase competition amongst other banks. This will prevent clients to switching to other banks for better deals.

The bank also extended a 2% cashback on all new mortgage drawdowns, supposed to end this month but got extended to the end of the year.

Karl Deeter was mentioned accusing the bank …

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Mortgage Market Update

The Financial Broker gives readers an overview on currently property prices and mortgage market conditions.

The Central Statistics Office published a report showing price inflation on property had increased 10.7% in the past year up to February. A similar report reveal how the number of newly build housing last year was 14,932 units when estimates denote a demand of up to 50,000 units. These numbers illustrate a problem in the current mortgage market, which this article pinpoints the causes of. The author laments about rising property prices, arguing that many potential home buyers have missed out on the prime time to purchase property, and are currently no long capable of affording the housing of their choice at an acceptable price.

The author attributes the current housing price and rent inflation in Ireland as consequences of a lack of supply in urban areas instead of lax macro-prudential regulations. In fact, she argues that current Central Bank regulations are too restrictive, and thus have prevented demanders from being able to locate and buy affordable housing. While the prudential regulations have lowered the …

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