Housing crisis only expected to get worse until 2023

According to Focus Ireland, the most optimistic statement on housing released by the government reveals that the housing crisis will continue get worse until 2022 or later. This statement is considered very optimistic as housing issues will likely progress into 2023.

The Department of Housing targets 48,000 new home completions by 2023. If this target is achieved, 2023 could be the first time that housing supply could potentially exceed housing demand. Figures provided by the Department of Housing have shown the first time that an admission denoted housing and homelessness will only continue to get worse in the next few years.

Although the Department of Housing has set a target of 48,000 new homes to be built by 2023, this target could be missed. If the target is completed or surpassed then burdens associated with the housing crisis could be significantly reduced. The problems that could be reduced would include reduced homelessness and new homes would create more supply for social and affordable housing. However, if homes were to be sold at current market values then the impact on …

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Changing Population and Effects on the Housing Crisis

According to the Central Statistics Office, Ireland’s population is expected to grow from 4.78 million in 2019 to 5.9 million by 2046. The growth is occurring due to economic growth and recovery since the 2008 recession. The population of Ireland has increased by just over a million people since 1999. The rapid population growth suggest an even greater demand for housing in the future. The housing crisis will only continue to progress, because demand for homes and apartments will only continue to grow as the population increases.

An additional 1.12 million people will need to be housed by 2046 as population continues to grow. At least 12,500 homes need to be built each year until 2021. This is a massive task, considering that Ireland built just over 8,500 homes in 2012.

Demographic changes in population also present challenges in supplying more housing. Ireland’s population is aging. The 2016 National Census has confirmed that there has been a 19.1% increase in people aged over 65. By 2046, people over the age of 65 are expected to account for 1.4 million of …

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Ireland affordability from a US student standpoint: Restaurant wages

Working in a restaurant can be an extremely exhausting job, especially when there are requests from a multitude of customers flying at you all at once. Luckily, the staffs ability to fulfill these requests timely and politely pays off in the form of monetary compensation; this is usually a successful motivational tool.

In recent months, there have been reports that many restaurants across the city of Dublin and far beyond have been unclear with customers about how their tips are being charged and where that extra cash ends up. For the most part, people assume that a server who provides exceptional service will receive the entirety of the tip that you leave for them. Many times, that assumption is wrong.

The Minister for Employment Affairs and Social Protection Regina Doherty has picked up on this issue, promising workers in this industry that there will be changes to the tipping system. These changes are aimed to make businesses more transparent about how this optional part of the bill is split up within the company.

As a customer, getting information …

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New Offers for Social Housing at Staggering Prices

A developer by the name of Pat Crean has offered 36 apartment for social housing to a local Dublin authority. Pat Crean’s Marlet development group offered to construct the apartments for the Dundrum area of Dublin. The Marlet group comprises of one of two fast-track housing applications for the Dundrum area of Dublin. The other part of the fast track housing application is formed by the Crekav Trading GP. Crekav Trading GP has proposed to sell 25 apartments from its overall planned 253 apartments in Greenacres, Longacre and Drumahill house. These 25 apartments have an estimated cost of €8.346 million.

The 36 apartments have been estimated at a cost to construct of €11.8 million. Meaning that on average the cost per apartment amounts to €327,888. In comparison, the Crekav trading GP’s 25 apartments have an average cost of €333,840.

The median home value in the Republic equates to €237,000. In comparison to the united states the median home value is $226,800. Adjusted to euros the median cost of a home in the US amounts to only €200,363.09. While the average price per …

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Ireland affordability from a US student standpoint: Groceries

There are many noticeable aspects that differ significantly between the United States and Ireland. For me, one of the largest changes is that the value of every euro I have us significantly more than that of my US dollar.

When coming to Ireland, I used my local bank to exchange dollars for euros with the euro being 1.2 times more valuable than my crisp dollar bill. Although I was aware of this rate, it has continuously thrown me off as I go in and out of sandwich shops, Tesco’s and the occasional Spar.

When I walk into any of these places, I think only in terms of my euros in hand. I am amazed by the €4 sandwiches, the €1.5 salads, and in general much less expensive grocery prices. When getting my first installment of groceries, I was amazed by the €36 price. This is because I usually spend around $50 at the grocery store in the US in order to stock up with those same ingredients.

Although that seemed cheap, the extra $5 in conversion made the payment just …

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Brexit takes more than just UK funds

As we are all well aware of by now, Brexit may affect the Irish economy. Although, one key part of the economy that we tend to overlook when it comes to this massive change is construction, which can and does play a significant role in our day-to-day life decisions.

Construction is much more intricate than just having laborers come in, swing around some tools, and build a structure. Specifics in supply and demand of laborers, resources, time, materials, consumers, money and a multitude of others aspects all play a part in construction outputs.

If Brexit is to occur, especially a no deal Brexit, there are a number of barriers that can arise. These barriers can and will be placed on construction companies, especially those currently working on a project. Some of these barriers include a reduced labor force, slower materials delivery, and possible construction penalties.

What current construction workers point out is that there is a steady decline in the amount of workers each year, and an even steadier decline in quality construction workers. If a hard …

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Illegal Irish flats similar to US university housing

During the month of May, a property in the city of Dublin was advertised as a flat, accommodating up to eight people comfortably. This listing, seemed normal to many prospective renters until they looked at the photographs.

This alleged flat seemed to many to be a converted office building. Upon further inspection, it was easy to see that this five bath, eight bed, and shared kitchen space were not exactly up to legal regulations, although this is conveyed as the least important aspect.

What most people seem to be most appalled by is the lack of privacy, and in some aspects, personal space that come from the conversion of an old workplace. The blocks of office areas were broken into two, leaving renters with thin walls between their two rooms.

Additionally, one of the rooms had three single beds pictured in one of the so-called rooms. This also put people in a frenzy, criticizing the renters on their lack of space management. In the end, it was found that this flat did not have the correct paperwork or …

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The Slowing Growth of Property Prices

The cost of property throughout Ireland has skyrocketed over the last 20 years. With the uncertainty in regard to Brexit, prices of homes are said to increase by less than recent years. Slower growth in price of homes may appear to be beneficial for the Irish housing market, but in reality costs of property are still trending to increase in price. Prices rose by 3.9 per cent compared to 4.3 per cent one month earlier. The increase is about four times less than the average percent growth increase of past years in Ireland.

So how will Brexit effect the housing market in Ireland? Some individuals believe that if the deal goes through, Ireland could play a more significant role in Europe. This trend is becoming prominent in Dublin. Massive companies like Facebook, Google, Paypal. eBay and Microsoft have moved their headquarters to Ireland. This change over the last few years means that there will be an increase in jobs and thus an influx of people. The more people means demand for housing will only further increase. If there is …

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Problems of the Irish Housing Market

The Irish housing market has faced a drastic increase in price of homes over the last 30 years. Of course inflation has contributed to the increase of the cost of homes, but inflation cannot nearly explain the massive jump in prices of Irish homes. More specifically, costs of housing has jumped more than five times the cost of a home 30 years ago.

So what does explain the massive rise in costs of property prices? Could it be that increase in salaries contribute to the rise of price in homes? I know that the average income today is much higher than it was 30 years ago. However, the rate that average income has increased over the last few decades is nowhere near the amount that housing prices have increased.

The maximum mortgage loan a homebuyer can be granted is his or her average salary multiplied by 3.5. According to the Irish Mirror, the average take weekly income of an irish person is €734 per week. Multiply this by 52 and you have €38168 before taxes. Even income before tax …

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