Mortgage lenders in Ireland

There are ten mortgage lenders in Ireland. AIB, Bank of Ireland, EBS, Finance Ireland, Haven, ICS/Dilosk, KBC, PTsb, Ulster Bank and Credit Unions.

A mortgage broker can help you make an application to all of them except for the EBS who don’t distribute through brokers and Credit Unions who have to be applied to directly and individually.

The main comparison between lenders is their interest rate, but there are many other features of a loan to consider such as the rates that may apply after a fixed rate expires, cash-back and other terms and features that are specific to loans from certain banks.

For instance, some lenders will let you overpay a fixed rate mortgage, others will penalize you if you do that. To find out more get in touch and we can help you figure out what lender is the best for your circumstances.

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If you need mortgage assistance during the covid 19 pandemic

Below is a list of numbers for the banks where you can speak to representatives who will be able to assist you with any concerns you have about making mortgage payments during the covid19 pandemic.

AIB 1890 252008

Bank of Ireland 01 6113333

EBS 1850 330044

Finance Ireland 1890 995998

Haven Mortgages 1850 654329

ICS Mortgages 1890 542542

KBC Bank 1800 939244

Permanent tsb 0818 502424

Ulster Bank 1800 435763

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ICS Building Society RIP 1864 – 2014

After 150 years the Irish Civil Service building society (known as ICS and a subsidiary of Bank of Ireland) is set to close. The letter delivered to the intermediary channel is on the left.

ICS started before the formation of the State and was subsumed into Bank of Ireland in the mid 1980’s.

The relationship with mortgage brokers was long standing, although in recent years there were a few developments which caused it to lose market share.

ICS first took brokers away from Bank of Ireland in c. 2009, previous to this brokers could deal with either a local branch (we dealt with now closed Westmoreland St. branch) or via ICS.

Then they reduced procurement fees, lastly they engaged in ‘dual pricing’ where it was cheaper to go to BOI than to ICS. All of these things were perhaps justified in the view of ICS but it didn’t mean people would then borrow from them and these things combined lead to less broker support …

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Don’t be late! Banks announcing cut off dates for mortgage cheques

Every year Santa brings a few unlucky kids some coal, the banks have a similar deal for people who are late with their paperwork and it’s called a ‘cut off date’.

This means that irrespective of what you do, you won’t be able to get a mortgage cheque if you submit paperwork after a certain date (we’ll list them as they come in). The problem for some people is that they might be reliant on closing in 2013 in order to get a legal property tax avoidance for owner occupiers so if you are going to try to draw down in December do yourself a favour and get everything sorted out ASAP.

And also remember, by ‘documents in’ that means ‘on the system’ and from the time a document arrives to when it gets scanned up can take a few days depending on the institution.

Cut off dates announced thus far:

BOI and ICS: Tuesday 17th

KBC: Friday 20th

(edit: 28/11/13 10:51am)

AIB/Haven: Monday 16th

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RTE Drivetime: What it’s like to be inside a debtors meeting

We were asked to talk to Drive Time on RTE radio about a borrower meeting we were at with a bank. This meeting was typical of the ones we regularly attend and also typical in both tone and outcome.

While we accept the bank have a collection agenda underpinned by the mortgage contract, their methods for obtaining a result are unnecessarily painful and that doesn’t make economic sense for any party involved.

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Lickety split-mortgages: are they really a solution? #splitfail

The calls for ‘more split mortgages’ are commonplace, what is often lacking is a deeper understanding of the flaws inherent. For instance, why was there any outcry at banks charging interest on the warehoused portion? Failure to do so is an effective write-down and cash flow loss.

That isn’t to say banks shouldn’t get both, but don’t dress it up in the flowery language of ‘split mortgages’, instead just say ‘we believe in write downs and cash flow losses’. Take an example where a bank doesn’t charge interest for 25 years on a €100,000 warehoused portion of a mortgage where a total of €300,000 is owed.

Assume a discount rate (we’ll side with ECB being able to do their job [mistake]) of 2%. The present value is = 1/(1+r)^n this is where ‘r’ is the rate and ‘n’ is the compounding periods. The reason for doing this is to give an idea of what the €100,000 would be worth in the future if there was no interest and inflation never went over 2%, the …

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ICS to be sold and currently ceasing mortgage offerings.

We have just found out that the EC have approved Bank of Ireland in keeping New Ireland assurance but that ICS must be sold and they are to stop accepting [glossary id=’6898′ slug=’mortgage’ /] applications with immediate effect.

We don’t actually know what this means at present, we have not been informed of how they will deal with pipeline applications, applications that are on the system and approved but not offered, or that are awaiting approval.

We have been told that it will be ‘business as usual’ but it may not be,we heard this line before from INBS and others, and if not this is going to cause quite a nightmare for many people and some them will be our clients.

This is out of our control, and not something we had a contingency plan for, but unlike the norm in Irish finance we are not going to wash our hands of it and say ‘not our fault’, this isn’t about blame, this is about Irish Mortgage Brokers doing a great job for every client we represent, and that isn’t …

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2013 the year banks told borrowers to hand back the keys?

We help different people with different things, and while most of our debt problem clients face broadly similar reactions from the banks, we think it’s important to post the documents which show a presence of lashings and lashings of stupid. To see the full letter click on the image at the bottom of the post

One such document was received by a client recently from the Irish Civil Service building society, also known as ICS and a subsidiary of Bank of Ireland. It’s no secret that posting these documents makes us highly disliked by the banks,  but if people don’t expose them then the great farce will go unchallenged.

What makes this case interesting is that the bank offered a short term forbearance plan which the client asked them to tweak. Then they turned around and changed their mind and went from ‘we can give you a few months to get your affairs in order’ to ‘sell the house or even abandon it’.

In 2008 to now I have never heard a bank say that walking away (also called jingle …

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