Dublin puts blame on Airbnb… again

The new protocol is whatever the issue is blame it on Airbnb.

Airbnb is being blamed for causing the housing crisis in Dublin. Critics are saying that the up and coming ‘hip’ way to travel site is causing apartments and houses that would be long-term let into short-time let. The site apparently contributing to Ireland’s housing shortage by taking housing off the market.

Policymakers and businesses has started a trend worldwide of blaming this short-term rental site for economic and societal problems with little evidence to back it up, claims Mark Paul from the Irish Times.

Ireland is not the only blaming Airbnb, New York has hotels (Airbnb’s competition) lobbying politicians left and right. Italy accused Airbnb of turning the country into a theme park.

Such problems are linked to issues in Venice from Airbnb, supposedly. With landlords making more money in a week from travelers compared to long-term lets in a month; therefore, the landlords are increasingly turning their properties into Airbnb listings. Venice being such a small city, there is not many places to rent in the first …

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Housing Prices push up living wage

The Living Wage Technical Group, an organization that annually calculates the wage required to support an acceptable standard of living in Ireland, recently published it’s 2017 report, listing the living wage as €11.70 an hour. This new rate is €0.20 higher than the previous rate and €2.45 higher than the actual minimum wage in Ireland.

 

The Living Wage Group defines the living wage as a rate that “provides employees with sufficient income to achieve an agreed acceptable minimum standard of living”. It is calculated to account for the price of various necessities such as clothing, food, housing, healthcare, and education. Out of these factors, many experts have attributed rising housing prices as the main reasons behind the need for higher wages.

 

In its 2017 report, the Living Wage Group supported this reasoning and published that “the current housing crisis, and associated increases in rent levels, has been the main driver of the increased wage rate”. The average house price in Ireland has risen 11.2% over the past year, with areas such as Dublin seeing even greater increases in …

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Generation X still suffering the consequences of the housing crash

A mortgage lender offers 100 percent mortgage and a little extra for furnishing the home, why not take it? This before the housing crash seemed like a fool-proof idea. House prices were continuously rising and real estate looked like a safe investment.

Then the housing market crashed. House prices dramatically dropped while unemployment rate was rising. Suddenly Generation X now has negative equity on a home. They’re owing more on a home than it’s actually worth. What do you do?

Generation Xers, classified being born between 1965 through 1984, had a majority out of a job or have had a huge pay cut and having negative equity on a home. Massive tax cuts and the expense of childcare has taken over the disposable income.

Living in a generation of spending culture, during the time of economic growth they did not think to save for retirement. Now …

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Eoghan Murphy wanting to expand mortgage-to-rent

Minister for Housing wants to decrease rules on mortgage-to-rent (MTR) scheme to help expand the programme. Relaxing the criteria will dramatically increase the number of MTR homes.

The goal of the scheme to allow an option for people who can’t qualify for social housing.

How it works?

A group of investors will buy trouble mortgages and will let the houses to the tenants as a form of social housing.

The aim of the programme was to aid around 250 homes a year. Currently, the statistics have shown that from 2012 to the end of March only 240 have went through the programme. This is out of 3,672 applications submitted.

The reason?

This scheme can take up to an 18 month turnaround which is too long for a lot of investors.

To help out the scheme currently, a homeowner can surrender their home to the lender which goes to the Housing Agency. They can offer them an approved housing bodies (AHBs). Then AHBs buys the home and lets it to the borrower as social housing.

The revised version of MTR.

It …

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House prices are increasing now up to €1,000 a week, up from previous report

MyHome.ie just released a report than claims house prices are increasing more than the Daft.ie report. MyHome.ie report doubles Daft.ie’s findings, a rival website.

A greater focus on property prices in Dublin may be the reason for the vast difference in price increase especially because Dublin average monthly increase is more than €5,000.

The report also indicates the possible increase of prices are due to the Help-to-Buy scheme being reviewed for termination. Fear from first-time buyers are rushing them to buy houses before the cancellation of the scheme.

The Help-to-Buy scheme can provide tax rebates up to €20,000. The property prices nationally were up 8.9 year-on-year.

Conall MacCoille, author of report, said the huge inflation of house prices can be from job growth, high competition among homebuyers, and rising income. This as well as the Help-to-Buy scheme contributed to a rapid increase of house prices.

An increase of first-time buyer lending and relaxing of the mortgage lending regulations is also a factor.

MacCoille is predicting a rush of mortgage lending in 2017 if the Help-to-Buy scheme is phased out and the …

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House prices to increase for up to 10 years

The Daft.ie report stated that the first six months of 2017 in Ireland the house prices has risen more than all of last year. They will continue to rise for the next five to ten years unless signification measures are taken.

The house prices are moving up 12 percent higher than a year ago with an average of €2,000 a month. This leaves Dublin on the forefront of the housing increase.

Housing prices increasing means more people wanting to sell their home with more than 6,000 homes listed for May. That has been the highest total since middle of 2008. However, this increase of property for sale is not even close to meeting the demand of the market.

With the government reviewing the Help-to-Buy scheme, fear comes as this may lead to another surge of people wanting to buy.

A Daft.ie economist Ronan Lyons warns the rates in Dublin are going to increase faster than any other part of Ireland. He said this was because, “we’ve regulated ourselves out of the volume of homes that are needed”.

The possible cause …

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A loan may be offered to vacant-home owners

In reference to Loan scheme aims to bring vacant homes into use by Paul Melia on 29 June 2017 in Independent.

A possible solution to the shortage of housing in Ireland: a local authority loan could be offered to property owners of vacant housing. This solution came about when it was heard that 80,000 vacant housing was available in high demand urban areas from the 2016 Census. About 100,000 units are vacant in non-urban areas, excluding holiday homes. Data shows Ireland’s vacancy rate is at 9 percent while UK is only at 2.5 percent.

Chairman of the Housing Agency Conor Skehan worries about the impact on Ireland’s competitiveness if the housing shortage issue is not addressed. Affordability is essential to Ireland’s competitiveness and the housing costs drives wage costs so if housing is imbalanced Ireland’s competitiveness may be in trouble.

The one stipulation of this loan is it has to be affordable housing. This could raise the issue to some houses in areas not usually affordable.

This loan, however, can be just what an owner needs to get a …

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Airbnb claims it is not affecting long-term letting

In reference to Airbnb cannot beat revenue from long-term letting, company says by Colin Gleeson on 28 June 2017 in the Irish Times.

On Wednesday, Airbnb spoke to the Oireachtas housing committee claiming that their service does not affect the long-term letting in Dublin. The reason- on average an Airbnb host has to rent out their place well over 120 nights a year to beat the money made from long-term letting. This means hosts would rather long-term let their place than short-term let, if the goal was profit.

Critics of the company are claiming that property owners are ditching the long-term letting and going exclusively to short-term lets. This would not be helping Dublin in this case due to the massive housing shortage.

Patrick Robinson, the Airbnb director of public policy for EMEA, came to the committee with vast amount of information on hosts, statistics, …

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Mortgage approvals up 45% in May

Data released by the Banking and Payments Federation Ireland revealed that mortgage approvals have gone up 35% May of this year in comparison to May of 2016.

 

There were a total of 4,124 mortgages approved in May, with a combined value of €884 million. This represents an increase of 1,078 mortgages and a €275 value compared to May of 2016.

 

This increase in mortgage approvals is likely caused by lower interest rates and by greater general confidence in the economy. It also represents a continuously growing demand in the housing market, and a supply that is slowly but surely catching up.

 

First time buyer mortgage approvals in particular are up 45.8%, the value of such mortgages also saw an even more dramatic increase of 60.7% compared to May of last year. This indicates growing confidence on the part of borrowers. First time buyers are purchasing more expensive housing and are seeing housing prices rise.

 

It is …

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Is there or is there not another housing bubble?

In reference to No evidence of another Irish housing bubble, IMF says by Peter Hamilton on 26 June 2017 in the Irish Times.

The answer is no but close monitoring is needed. A Washington-based company, the International Monetary Fund (IMF), has confirmed there is no housing bubble in Ireland. Even with the quickly rising prices of property and an increase of mortgage approvals, IMF realizes this is significant but it is not a housing bubble… yet.

There is no statistics to show there is an imbalance of the pricing of houses. However, there is an increase demand for housing that could lead to an imbalance, especially with the Central Bank’s mortgage lender rules and the help-to-buy scheme for first timers. IMF has recommended close monitoring of the market to make sure a bubble is not formed.

The likeliness of this increase of housing demand should …

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