Why people will still invest in property in 2016

We plan to go through the maths soon of why the tax breaks that ended in 2014 were a bigger driver of a slow down in the market than the Central Bank rules, this aside, people will still invest in property.

The world of investment is relative, not absolute and for the €90 billion sitting in deposit earning 1% (at best) or less the implications are clear, you have to invest somewhere or get substandard returns which will eventually be eroded by inflation.

Along with a future of quantitative easing in Europe, the likelihood of a Dollar that will get stronger and a stock market that looks toppy to many, property will remain a focus for better or worse with many people who have money.

On the capital side you have a known shortage of property, that would lead some to believe there are significant capital gains to be had. On the dividend or yield side, you have strong rents which are still showing signs of rising.

Rents are certainly very strong versus the return on deposits even when you …

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The big switch

The time is coming near where One Big Switch say they will be shaking up the mortgage market in Ireland by using the power of group persuasion to get a bank to make an offer that is lower than that which is currently available.

Is this likely to succeed? In particular given that even the Central Bank and Government have failed when it comes to demanding that banks lower their rates?

We would think ‘yes’, because this campaign speaks to banks in the language they understand most, that of customers and money. With loan growth becoming much slower and aggregate credit continuously shrinking for the last eight years, it means that banks don’t have a large amount of choices for new business.

Attrition will be part of the plan and it isn’t one shackled by the Central Bank lending rules because they don’t apply to switcher loans where there is not a top up element to the loan. This means you take a proven credit track record and equity in the property and you obtain what we refer to as …

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Pre-emptive insolvency, the time is now.

A headline today caught our attention, it was about an injunction to have an insolvency solution honoured.

Personal insolvency is a legislation backed process (unlike informal debt deals) and for this reason you can’t unilaterally decide, as a creditor, to opt out of one that is already in existence.

What is interesting at this point in time is that many of the applications we track in the courts when gathering possession statistics are about applications for change of name of the plaintiff. This occurs when loan books are being sold and the proceedings are being altered to reflect the new owner.

There is considerable confusion even within the courts because of this and it may be a case that a person could use this as an opportunity to seek personal insolvency because in the midst of this there is a lower level of likelihood that loan buyers will engage in the process.

Failing to do this means they lose …

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Newstalk Sunday Show: A discussion on the ‘Tsunami of repossessions’ that hasn’t arrived

On Newstalk’s ‘The Sunday Show’ Shane Coleman spoke to Karl Deeter (of Irish Mortgage Brokers) and David Hall of the IMHO.

It was to cover the topic of repossessions and some research that had  been carried out by Karl Deeter and several others (Seamus Coffey, Economics lecturer in UCC, Brendan Burgess of AskAboutMoney.com and Simon Farrell, researcher) about what occurs in courts during possession hearings.

The debate was robust and lively.

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Podcast: How to get cheap insurance with Darragh Farrell, episode 00003

In this podcast we briefly looked at how to get cheap insurance. The amount of people who overpay for insurance is high in our opinion, and while it’s great that some folks seem to want to do all they can to make insurance companies profitable, we don’t agree with that so we spoke about ways to chop your bill down while keeping the same cover.

Darragh Farrell has been with us for almost a decade and has been a financial advisor for far longer, he holds his QFA and is also the person who heads up our sister site yes.ie which is purely about financial services.

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Podcast: Mistakes that first time buyers make with Joanne Daly, episode 00001

Joanne Daly has been a broker for 13 years and in this piece she speaks to Karl Deeter about the errors that first time buyers make prior to making their mortgage application, thankfully most of what she mentions is easily rectified!

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The ‘Talking Money’ book by Karl Deeter & Jill Kerby

We are delighted that Irish Life decided to sponsor our book ‘Talking Money’ which is based on the successful radio segment that has been on the RTE Radio 1 ‘Drivetime’ show with Mary Wilson for about the last year and a half.

It’s free to download, here is a link to a pdf copy, or you can get it from Irish Life’s website, and we’ll have a limited number of hard copies too.

We are really excited about this and hope you find the information in the book useful – one thing is for sure, the price is right!

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Can one person in a married couple take out a mortgage?

This is a question we regularly get, and it’s a tricky answer because it’s both ‘yes’ and ‘no’. If the property is a homeloan the answer is ‘no’, if it’s a buy to let then the answer is ‘yes’.

Perhaps you are wondering why this might be a question? Normally it’s because one of the couple have an issue that would adversely affect the mortgage application, such as a spouse who has a bad credit rating, or they might have other debts (like cars or personal loans).

Another thing that we see is the likes of Stamp 4 status or a persons legal status being an issue so in this case you might see them factored in when it comes to the running costs estimated but the lender will not factor in any of their income, this then puts very negative pressure on the application.

Can it be done? Not without committing a version of mortgage fraud. Regulated entities are required to disclose all facts to the bank when making a credit application on behalf of a customer (CP10 declaration), …

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One of us isn’t a first time buyer, so can we get 90%?

Something that comes up with regular frequency is a question about ‘being a first time buyer’. The simple version is ‘one of us bought a house in (year XXXX) or had a house in the UK or invested in one with a friend’ etc. Now that person is in a relationship with a new person and they want to know if as a couple, they are a first time buyer.

The answer? No.

Sadly, this is similar to the way that Tax Relief at Source used to work, if you had bought a house anywhere in the world, including Timbuktu, you are no longer a first time buyer and by extension, neither is anybody that you buy a house with.

The fix? Sometimes the one person who is a first time buyer can qualify for the loan and they are able to do it themselves, years ago the answer was ‘two on mortgage one on the deed’ in order to be able to obtain Tax Relief at Source (which is now gone for all loans)

Nowadays you see only that …

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RTE Talking Money – AirBnB (making a house pay), 17th August 2015

With Revenue set to receive the names of over 9,000 AirBnB ‘hosts’ we looked at the implications of this as well as other ways to make your house pay for itself. The obvious one is the tax free €12,000 ‘rent a room’ scheme, but it doesn’t stop there! Find out more as Karl Deeter and Jill Kerby ‘Talk Money’.

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