Today FM: The last word, Matt Cooper talks to Karl Deeter & Ruth Coppinger

Karl Deeter was on Today FM’s ‘The Last Word’ with Matt Cooper to discuss proposals by TD Ruth Coppinger to break the law if you are at risk of eviction.

Our view is that the law should be honoured and that to suggest breaking the law ought to be way down the list of suggestions for people with housing difficulties. It would make far more sense to speak to the Department of Social Protection and to use the services and protections that we have set up as a society rather than to take the law into your own hands.

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The cost of turfing out tenants

It is often assumed that landlords don’t want to give people long leases preferring to see people leave and obtain a rent increase where possible. This belief doesn’t factor in several concerns, firstly is that rents are not always rising, that moving is an inconvenience to both tenant and landlord and that there are some hard costs to factor in.

For this reason we created a small basic calculation to show that in many cases the recouping costs equate to more than a months rent and that a landlord would have to increase rents by about 12% to break even.

The other thing that happens is the landlord takes on a new risk of an unknown tenant, good tenants are like good credit applicants, they often don’t pay top rates because of their past performance, a new person might be habitually late, break more, or be more high maintenance.

This is yet another reason that shows the benefit of a long lease to a landlord, equally the tenant also benefits by having the protections of a …

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Rent control Europe: Czech Republic

Population: 10,553,443 GDP: $189,982,000,000 Avg. Weekly Earnings: €198.25 Avg. Apartment Price (Per. Sq. M.): €3,384.00 For 120-sq. m. apartment in city centre Avg. Monthly Rent: €475.73

Any analysis of rent control in Europe must take careful note of the example that is the Czech Republic, where an estimated 90% of households lived in rent-controlled housing as of 2006. Since then, the country has begun the slow transition to a market-based system, although this has not been without pitfalls; there is a general consensus in favour of readdressing housing regulation legislation, but this has been met with considerable resistance by the citizens.

The prospect of citizens being responsible for their own housing is a new, and alien idea for Czechs, many of whom believe that the provision and maintenance of housing is the responsibility of the government. What has resulted is a split system: older Czechs live in rent controlled housing governed by the Price Regulation of the Ministry of Finance, whereas new renters, foreigners, and any property built after 1993 exists in the free market, with freely negotiated rental rates.

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Savings of €635 a year to be made in Mortgage Protection

We were mentioned in an article by Charlie Weston writing in the Independent about mortgage protection. The point was raised (figures supplied by the Competition and Consumer Protection Commission) that savings of up to €635 were possible.

The parts mentioning Irish Mortgage Brokers are what follows next: It’s normally done on a “joint life, first event” basis which means that if two people take out the policy and die simultaneously it only pays out once and the sum is usually engineered to cover only the balance of the loan.

It does this because it’s created as a “decreasing-term” policy, which means the amount it pays out decreases over time, the same as your mortgage does as you pay it.

It has a set term, in line with the mortgage term, according to Karl Deeter of Irish Mortgage Brokers.

So if you take out a mortgage for €250,000 over 25 years then this policy should track it fairly closely, so that if the policy holder or holders die the mortgage is cleared.

Typically, it’s the cheapest type of life …

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Thankfully there isn’t any Tsunami when you consider hard facts

There has been an ongoing commentary about ‘Tsunami’s’ of repossessions that are occurring right now or just about to and we have been part of what we feel is a more realistic interpretation of the facts.

Yes, people have lost their homes and more will, that is always part of the outcome after a massive financial crisis, one of the largest ever, and in a nation that set records for the size and scope of their financial problems.

To think it could be any other way is the same as expecting a health system where nobody ever dies irrespective of the problems they may have. That kind of belief is not rooted in reality.

We think that the correct response is rapid and fair intervention where warranted, and zero protections where properties are abandoned and no payments are being made.

Within this vista there are those who would have you believe the world is being torn asunder and nobody is doing anything about it.

Here are some of the statistics from the courts covering the first quarter of 2016.

New …

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What the Central Bank said about cases in arrears that are in the court system

Below is an email excerpt from the Central Bank on the area of court proceedings. We get frustrated with misinformation about stadiums of people doomed to homelessness and sums up around 20,000 court proceedings being bandied about. They are bad numbers and should be ignored, however, it doesn’t stop people from repeating things that are wrong.

There is also the information (not yet public as far as I know) from the Court Service which indicates the live number of cases in the system at the end of the same period was 12,252 again, nowhere near some of the figures that were being trumped about at the time.

(email below)

> From: CentralBank <*****@centralbank.ie> > Date: ** April 2016 at 15:18:19 GMT+1 > To: ********** > Subject: RE: Clarification of Quarterly Arrears Stats > > Hi *****, Somebody else has just come back to me with a more useful answer for you: The figure for PDH mortgages – at end-December 2015-there were around 13,500 accounts for which court proceedings have been issued (and have not yet concluded). > > …

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Time to stop third party meddlers from progress prevention

A common theme in the frustrations of life generally is where you have a third party who can disrupt the intentions of another and in turn remain fairly unaffected themselves. This article appeared in the Sunday Business Post on the 29th of May and was on that topic.

(original below)

A system which allows unfair delays to those trying to deliver housing must be scrapped.

Best known for penning The Prince, a Renaissance-era handbook for unscrupulous politicians, Florentine historian Niccolo Machiavelli advised: “Never attempt to win by force what can be won by deception.”

To that end, if there’s one way to annoy a third-party meddler it’s to identify them. It gets their back up.

The ‘deception’ in this respect is the common acceptance of third-party rights. Unconnected third parties should not (and don’t) have the right to intrude on your private life or private moveable property as long as you aren’t breaking the law. But when it comes to immovable or fixed property, we don’t act the same way. We allow anyone to voice their dissent and disrupt a …

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Is equality about money or rights?

In this piece which appeared originally in the Sunday Business Post on the 8th of May 2016, Karl Deeter questions the conventional wisdom of calls for a right to housing (or housing equality) being about ‘rights’ and that it is perhaps more about money and governance.

The script after this text in italics is the text of the article that was published.

When we hear people talk about inequality or social issues like housing, is it about money and process or is it about rights? This may seem obvious at first, but when you start to look into it, often it’s not so simple.

It’s obvious that a person with no place to call home isn’t equal to those who have such a place (be it rented or owned) and civil society generally accepts that this implies a certain level of duty on the rest of us.

Usually the state helps to equalise this situation by making the provision of a place to call home possible, be it social housing or emergency accommodation. This would lead to the assumption that …

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Irish Examiner quotes Irish Mortgage Brokers on planning

The Irish Planning Institute held their national convention in Athlone and we were pleased to see one of our own as one of the opening speakers at it. The points raised about planning, housing, and the importance of household wealth were received well by the audience which was about 300 strong and made up of the key players in planning throughout Ireland.

Claire O’Sullivan of The Irish Examiner followed up with a good piece on the conference and quoted Karl Deeter extensively, the excerpts from the article are below.

The Government should consider removing the rights of people to object to proposed developments as it is hugely costly, causes delays, and is not necessary, the Irish Planning Institute’s annual conference heard.

A compliance manager with the Irish Mortgage Brokers Association, Karl Deeter, said instead there should be greater trust in the ability of planners and the local authority.

He said a “third party right to object” did not exist in many countries as the planning departments and local authority are expected to make the correct decision.

“The role …

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The Edmund Honohan plan, in a nutshell, it’s bad policy

Last night on Claire Byrne Live the Master of the High Court, Edmund Honohan said that the constitution didn’t stand in the way of the state being able to pursue certain social agendas when it came to property and property rights.

This hinged on the back of an article in which the Minister with responsibility for housing Alan Kelly apparently said that the constitution blocked his ability to resolve our housing crisis, Honohan rebutted this with an open letter in the Sunday Independent.

What follows is an extract of the letter: Consequently, if the Oireachtas is of the view that the State should itself (or its local authorities) provide public housing “in the Common Good”, the State can (and probably, legally, should) decide not to wait the two/three years needed to build social housing but instead to immediately acquire houses now in private hands.

If the owners of these refuse to sell, acquisition can be by compulsory purchase with full compensation assessed by the arbitrator.

It so happens that there is a stock of such housing which has …

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