Industry in Wesel, Germany

Wesel is a city in Germany, North Rhine-Westphalia with about sixty thousand people. There are some different types of industrial companies. One type is the chemical industry which is strongly represented in Wesel with the bigger companies like Altana Chemistry, BYK Chemistry, the LGC Standards and Oxoid. The Altana Chemistry was created in 1977 and has about six thousand five hundred employees now and makes a turnover of more than 2.3 billion euros.

The BYK Chemistry is a big company too and employs worldwide more than two thousand three hundred employers, thereof about nine hundred in Wesel. They make a turnover of more than one billion euros per year, so they are a bit smaller than the Altana Chemistry. Both companies are important for the inhabitants, because they need many of them as employees.

One more company in Wesel of a different type is Geberit, a well-known manufacturer of sanitary ceramics. They have six locations in Germany. They produce their products since more than hundred years currently with three hundred employees at the location in Wesel. The company produce about …

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Newstalk interviews Karl Deeter about getting the country back to work

In an interview that drew a massive listener reaction, Pat Kenny interviewed Karl Deeter about the reasons he believes we need to get people back to work sooner rather than later. We would stress the point that this isn’t implied as doing so in a reckless manner, hand hygiene, distancing and other protocols already being followed in shops and essential services jobs would be required. Dr. Sam McConkey was also on to critique his view. The debate was well rounded and respectful, you can listen to the clip below.

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Making housing more affordable

This paper was written by Karl Deeter and covers many different aspects of housing in Ireland. It was written last year so there are parts of it that are not as current as we’d like it to be. Publishing was delayed for various reasons, but we hope that it provides a good background on the many facets of housing delivery in Ireland where some changes could make a difference to delivery.

The bad news is that there isn’t any one ‘grand idea’, the good news is that smaller changes across different areas of housing could help to provide a more steady stream of affordable homes in the future.

The working report  Making housing affordable in Ireland is in the link, there are still final views, corrections and critiques to consider, but it should give the reader a good insight into housing problems and housing solutions in Ireland today.

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Bank loans in Bulgaria

Bank loans in Bulgaria

My name is Hristo Dimitrov. I’m a student from Varna Bulgaria.

How to pick bank loans in Bulgaria

In Bulgaria you can borrow relatively easily for an apartment and pay it off within 30 years. The maximum loan amount for the banks are up to EUR 200,000.  Also, Bulgaria has low interest rates compared to other countries. The best conditions for buying a home are on Postbank

And DSK Bank.

For specific rules and percentages, you can look at them.

APR at individual interest rate selected for the purposes of the example * – 3.66%

An example of a fixed interest rate for the last 3 years and a variable interest rate (benchmark interest rate + margin) for the remaining term of the loan when included in the DSK Coz Plus Sales Prohibition Program.

 

The long-term interest rate for the implementation of the DSK Coz Plus program can be set in the range of 3.00% to 4.49%.

 

 

Amount of credit

BGN 100,000

 

Monthly payment

448,49 BGN

 

Term of the loan

30 …

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50 Reasons Ireland Should Consider Tall Buildings

Here are 50 reasons why Ireland should consider tall buildings for residential and commercial purposes:

1. Saves Space – In a world with a growing population, developing buildings vertically allows for more space and more people. The land available for buildings is finite, and while tall buildings have a height limit, cities and towns can better utilize this space by building more tall, vertical buildings.  

Source: Wray, Sarah. “’Mini Cities’: The Rise of Tall Buildings.” Smart Cities World, www.smartcitiesworld.net/opinions/opinions/mini-cities-the-rise-of-tall-buildings

2. Creates More Homes – There is a correlation between density of a city with the number and height of tall buildings. High-rises allow for more homes by building vertically rather than building wide or horizontally. 

Source: “The Pros and Cons of the Skyscraper.” RG Group, 17 Apr. 2018, rg-group.co.uk/the-pros-and-cons-of-the-skyscraper/#

3. Creates More Office Space – Tall buildings or skyscrapers are able to satisfy the needs and desires for companies to be in proximity together in dense, urban areas. Building up answers vast company demand for city office space. 

Source: Barr, Jason. “The Economics of Skyscraper Height (Part IV): …

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The Rise of Income Inequality in the United States Part 2

Previously, I discussed the theory that wealth inequality is growing in the United States. A lot of this wealth inequality is due to the fact that Americans don’t report all of their information regarding their taxes. The following are some ways to improve wealth and saving data:

Employer pensions could be accurately estimated as well as the value of homes Other financial institutions could report balances as well. This would improve wealth distribution estimates. The concentration of taxable capital income has risen enormously for the 0.1%. This percentage used to be 10% in the 1960s and 1970s and has grown to 33% (2012). The rise coincides with the Tax Reform Act of 1986 reflecting changes in tax avoidance rather than in the distribution of true economic value. Some profits of partnerships and s-corps include income labor component reflecting a rise of top entrepreneurial income rather than pure capital income. Dividends and interest earned through mutual funds, s-corporations, partnerships, holding companies, and some trusts end up being included in the interest and dividends section of the ultimate individual owner’s tax return. …

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Affordability Tradeoffs – Food for Thought

“Virtually anything can be made more affordable in isolation, simply by transferring resources to it from elsewhere in the economy” -Thomas Sowell (American economist and social theorist)

Three of the primary things Bernie Sanders, an American presidential candidate, is trying to make more affordable are housing college, health insurance. Has anybody stopped to ask, what will happen to the economy three steps down the line if his policies were to be enacted? Thomas Sowell believes that transferring extensive resources from other activities to subsidize an exorbitant luxury makes the country poorer as a whole.

Medicare for all is estimated to cost between 2.8-3.2 trillion U.S. dollars per year. This is an exorbitant luxury. Housing for all is estimated to cost 2.5 trillion dollars. This is an exorbitant luxury. College for All would cost 70 billion per year from the state and national governments per year. This doesn’t mention his cancel all student debt plan (student debt in the united states is currently 1.6 trillion dollars. This is an exorbitant luxury.

Bernie Sanders’ plan fails to recognize tradeoffs and opportunity costs. Price …

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The Rise of Income Inequality in the United States

When a candidate like Bernie Sanders promises free health care and free education, many Americans have jumped at the idea of voting for him. Why? Many Americans feel something radical must happen in order to turn wealth inequality around. Here are 3 Trends in wealth inequality in the United States.

Income inequality in the United States has followed a U-shaped trend since 1913. The low-point in the wealth inequality graph occurs right around 1980. This shows that income equality was its lowest at that point than it was in the last hundred years. Most of the growth in the top 10% and top 1% can be attributed to the growth of the top 0.1%. The top 0.1%’s share of wealth has risen from 7% in the late 1970s to 22% in 2012 (most recent data available). The rise of the top 1%’s concentration of taxable income rises dramatically at the time of the Tax Reform Act of 1986 This change reflects changes in tax avoidance rather than in the distribution of true economic value

2.  The wealth share of the bottom 90% …

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Financial Plan Factors to Consider

A financial plan is an instrument everyone with money should create. A financial plan is any drawn out concept in which showcases some direction of where you would like your finances to go. Whether you are taking your financial situation into your own hands or seeking advice from a professional, with both options, individuals should have a written plan of expectations. However, when crafting these expectations, there are many factors one should consider in order to account for life. Here are some factors that one should consider while planning their life’s financial plan:

 

Employment – What is your employment status? Do you feel stable in your current position? Are you happy at your current job? If you are unhappy, are you considering switching to a new company? These are important questions regarding one’s employment that should be considered. The most ideal position someone could be in is one in which an individual is happy and feels stable within the company. However, if you are unhappy with your job and you are considering moving position, consider how the job change …

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