Deise FM on WLR: talking mortgages

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Arrears solution for a strategic defaulter: here’s a new plan you can ignore

We make no secret of dealing with strategic defaulters, depending on the client we don’t necessarily say that they are in that category, but with most of them we try to be forthright enough to make it clear that what they are doing is intentional and doesn’t have to be this way. That aside, the banks are still trying to find ways to resolve the issues.

One such offer came to one client from PTsb. The interesting thing here is that the client did fill in an SFS and was refused split mortgages and other such options because they didn’t qualify but continued to pay zero.

Then they get an offer to capitalise the arrears. That’s wonderful, they are now no longer in arrears once they sign up to this! What a great outcome, now they can go back to repaying zero and start the whole clock all over again.

So, having racked up about 18 months of un-paids on interest only the arrears will now be (upon signing) back …

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Lickety split-mortgages: are they really a solution? #splitfail

The calls for ‘more split mortgages’ are commonplace, what is often lacking is a deeper understanding of the flaws inherent. For instance, why was there any outcry at banks charging interest on the warehoused portion? Failure to do so is an effective write-down and cash flow loss.

That isn’t to say banks shouldn’t get both, but don’t dress it up in the flowery language of ‘split mortgages’, instead just say ‘we believe in write downs and cash flow losses’. Take an example where a bank doesn’t charge interest for 25 years on a €100,000 warehoused portion of a mortgage where a total of €300,000 is owed.

Assume a discount rate (we’ll side with ECB being able to do their job [mistake]) of 2%. The present value is = 1/(1+r)^n this is where ‘r’ is the rate and ‘n’ is the compounding periods. The reason for doing this is to give an idea of what the €100,000 would be worth in the future if there was no interest and inflation never went over 2%, the …

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Savage Sunday: Today FM 8th September 2013

The panel on this weeks Savage Sunday was Tony Williams, Kate Shanahan and Karl Deeter. The topics were Priory Hall, in particular KBC writing to a recently widowed debtor seeking arrears payments, politics, mortgages and property, Ivan Yates and finishing off with some thoughts on Ryan Air.

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Let’s take the emotion out of strategic default

(this article originally appeared in the Sunday Business Post on the 8th of September 2013) The term ‘strategic default’ lacks a definition. Because of this, any debate that incorporates this term is, in part, pointless. Discussing something so undefined can only end in disagreement if the topic is entirely subjective. There are those who refuse to accept it exists, just as there were those who once refused to believe the world is round. Many continue to insist that, in pretty much all circumstances, borrowers are innocent.

They aren’t, just as the banks are not innocent either. As a day-to-day practitioner, I know that strategic default is real. I have seen it, dealt with it, made money on the back of advising people doing it and continue to do so. People hire guys like me to push back against banks like ours.

Some attempt must be made to determine what does and doesn’t constitute a strategic default. A failure to do so means we face a double dilemma. The first is to turn the national debate into one focused on the …

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2fm with Colm Hayes: Mortgage Defaults

We spoke to Colm Hayes on 2fm about the issue of non-engagement by some borrowers, it is important to stress that this is not the ‘average arrears case’, it’s a cohort within them.

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Let the bullshit begin, the document behind the ‘Kilkenny Trust’

We obtained a copy of the Kilkenny Trust ‘trust document’, our sources say it’s a copy and paste job at best with some additional non-important nuances thrown in. What you will notice is the absence of reference to any particular law (many documents with a legal foundation state the referenced legislation on them), and diminished powers of the trustee.

This might look like some big important document, but is it realistic to believe that this humble 8 pages will genuinely protect anybody from the liens creditors have on their folios?

Have a read of it yourself and see what you think… (click on the image below)

 

 

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Banking flim-flam, ‘We’ll huff and puff and may or may not blow your house down!’

The banks are constantly issuing threatening letters, we have posted many of them here. We have seen it all at this stage, couples in their 60’s with lots of equity being told to sell up when they clearly didn’t have to, others who are able to get massive write downs and every other combination of fact you can imagine.

Today we will look at the huffing and puffing portion of banks chasing a person for debts. The page to the left is a chronological example of letters a borrower will get from the bank. In this instance the person is defaulting because they don’t want to go on capital and interest and are engaging in what amounts to a game of ‘chicken’ with the banks.

The first letter is standard, it came after the client missed about 4 months of payments, to this point there were two calls then this letter.

The letter starts off fairly heavy, in terms of implications, they …

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What banking insiders think of what banks are going to do

We got a comment on our site from an ex-banker who heard a radio segment where we were talking about banks and repossessions. We got in touch and asked if we could post his comment as a stand alone entry, he agreed, his thoughts are very interesting and in part might help explain why we have repossession orders without repossessions, eye opening reading…

I listened to your piece on Newstalk this morning (19/08/2013) regarding ‘strategic defaulters’ and I just wanted to congratulate you for highlighting the reality of this issue.

I worked for the former *closed bank* for over 17 years and for a two year period I was it’s Mortgage (Residential) Administration Manager. Although I’m out of banking now I still help former clients with negotiations with various banks.

My experience over the past couple of years, and especially this year, in ‘dealing’ with the banks, foreign and domestic, has exposed some incredibly unethical and unfair practices and on the whole I fear …

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Defining ‘Strategic Default’

One of the things the whole strategic default issue lacks is any set definition. There are words that get used with motives embedded in them, such abuse of language only exists when there is not a set meaning to the word. To call a default strategic is two very different things depending on who is talking about it.

To a bankers mind it might mean any loan unpaid where the person has a penny to spare, to a borrower it might only be where a person withholds all money from the lender and goes and lives the life of Reilly.

I’m asking for your help on this one, please use comments to add your thoughts and I’ll re-edit the post appropriately.

To start with I’ll attempt to define a strategic default on multi-investment properties, there are other types so feel free to give the example or way of defining it as you see it.

1. Multi-investment property investors: Where the person is collecting rent and paying interest only, then the bank look for capital and interest and the person goes …

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