The ‘Talking Money’ book by Karl Deeter & Jill Kerby

We are delighted that Irish Life decided to sponsor our book ‘Talking Money’ which is based on the successful radio segment that has been on the RTE Radio 1 ‘Drivetime’ show with Mary Wilson for about the last year and a half.

It’s free to download, here is a link to a pdf copy, or you can get it from Irish Life’s website, and we’ll have a limited number of hard copies too.

We are really excited about this and hope you find the information in the book useful – one thing is for sure, the price is right!

Read More

Irish Property Buyers Handbook 2014

We were pleased to see a mention in the Irish Times of the Irish Property Buyers Handbook 2014 which is now available. We did a chapter on mortgage finance which helps to explain the do and don’t things to consider when looking for [glossary id=’6898′ slug=’mortgage’ /] finance.

The book covers every facet of purchasing a property from starting the search to closing the deal, well done to Carol Tallon for this updated version of the book which will surely help some of this years first time buyers.

Read More

Sorted! Survive and thrive in a recession

I like John Maguire, and a part of me knows that this article is about a bit of spin to make interesting reading, but it also provokes a bit of a laugh too because the quotes are pure gold… (having met the guy I can’t help but suspect it was ghost written).

At the starting line of the Berlin Marathon, I chain-smoked five cigarettes while rubbing Tiger Balm into my legs.

I used to joke that only two things would survive a nuclear winter: cockroaches and me.”

The smart thing would have been to take my spare cash and move to my mortgage-free place in Dubai with its private beach.”

I would do things other people were not prepared to do, just to prove a point.”

In between those legendary quotes there is the story of taking a dive into the downturn that so many in this industry have faced, I can tell you from experience it is a painful learning experience, but learn you will whether you want to or not.

John has …

Read More

The Economic Naturalist, Robert H. Frank (book review)

Robert H. Frank of Cornell University wrote a great book called ‘The Economic Naturalist, why economics explains almost everything‘, it has been an absolute winner of a read, and kindly Robert (Bob) took a phone call from me to talk about his book (more on that later).

Regarding the book, it is excellent if you are not actually into economics, because it takes everyday things and tries to use economic foundations for explaining them, the questions are simple every day occurrences and the answers are often surprising!

Here are a few simple examples, ‘why are cans of fizzy drinks round and milk bottles are square’, ‘why do animal rights activists throw paint at women in fur but not bikers in leather’, ‘why do taxi drivers stop working early on rainy days’, ‘why are plane tickets purchased at the last minute more expensive’, and many …

Read More

Boom Bust, house prices, banking, and the depression of 2010 by Fred Harrison (book review)

I have been quite public about my belief in property tax (caveat being we should have far less income tax/levies etc. perhaps a ‘flat tax’ would be best), and if there is one book that has really helped to shape that opinion quite succinctly it is Fred Harrison’s masterpiece on the topic, and the subject of this review ‘Boom Bust‘.

Fred Harrison saw the property crash in the UK of 1989/90 in 1980, and furthermore, he named a date, he also named a date of specifically 2010 (as a bottom, not as the ‘start’ of a crash) in the mid 90’s. How? It is due to his analysis which goes back to the 1500’s of property cycles, and while I am still sceptical about his ’18 year’ cycle, the one thing that fully convinced me was the basis and need for a more rational and working approach to property and taxation of same, or the ‘democratisation …

Read More

The Final Crash, by Hugo Bouleau (book review & interview)

Hugo Bouleau’s (pseudonym of the author) book was for me, perhaps the most riveting reading of 2008. I like to underline important sentences in books, it’s a habit I picked up from a history teacher in secondary school. Looking back through ‘The Final Crash’ I can safely say I went through a whole pencil!

Bouleau writes the book not only from his practitioner experience as an asset manager for a large private bank in the Channel Islands (he is also a fellow of the Securities & Investment Institute), not only from his educational background from City University in London, but from that of a concerned citizen of the world who realises the core issue of the financial crisis, the one that remains largely uncovered in the day to day reporting, that of debt and leverage, in particular, that of irresponsible debt, and excessive leverage.

Bouleau has since changed careers, having recently started a Sharia compliant Islamic Finance operation. I caught up with him on the phone just as …

Read More

The Final Crash, by Hugo Bouleau (book review & interview)

Hugo Bouleau’s (pseudonym of the author) book was for me, perhaps the most riveting reading of 2008. I like to underline important sentences in books, it’s a habit I picked up from a history teacher in secondary school. Looking back through ‘The Final Crash’ I can safely say I went through a whole pencil!

Bouleau writes the book not only from his practitioner experience as an asset manager for a large private bank in the Channel Islands (he is also a fellow of the Securities & Investment Institute), not only from his educational background from City University in London, but from that of a concerned citizen of the world who realises the core issue of the financial crisis, the one that remains largely uncovered in the day to day reporting, that of debt and leverage, in particular, that of irresponsible debt, and excessive leverage.

Bouleau has since changed careers, having recently started a Sharia compliant Islamic Finance operation. I caught up with him on the phone just as …

Read More

The Millionaire next door (book review)

About ten years ago my sister bought me a book called ‘The Millionaire next door‘. This was when a million still meant something! In todays markets where Governments are throwing billions, and indeed trillions at problematic markets a million doesn’t seem like much!

However, this book is well worth a read, it covers many of the things that are effectively the ‘lifestyle habits’ of people who have more than a million in net worth outside of their primary home. One of the main tenets of the book is that you should spend less than you earn, so simple and yet so hard! It’s like saying ‘consume less calories than you burn’, which is also easy to say but hard to do.

The Millionaire Next Door is a good book for people to read when they are becoming financially independent, it helps to spell out some of the basic home truths about money by looking at the lives of people who have reached a high …

Read More