Only one in three approved homes have been started

With reference to Work has yet to start on 23,000 homes in capital which have permission by Paul Melia on June 26 2017 in Independent.

To keep up with the rising demand of the housing market around 30,000 to 35,000 houses need to be completed every year. With 7,975 houses completed and 5,261 under construction, that leaves around 64 percent or 23,700 of the approved homes yet to begin. In Dublin particularly, 5,643 out of the 7,277 or 77 percent approved have yet to start as well.

Speculations on why this could be is developers with not enough funding or they could be hoarding the land expecting the housing prices to further rise, claimed Society of Chartered Surveyors and State bad-bank Nama.

With 36,936 homes approved, it leaves two out of three home plans not being started. Since there is currently a housing shortage, talk of imposing a holding property tax has been circulating. With this shortage of houses there has been a significant increase in housing and rent, especially in Dublin.

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Warren Buffet saves the day for a Canadian mortgage lender

In reference to Warren E. Buffet Comes to the Aid of a Big Canadian Mortgage Lender by Michael J. de la Merced on June 22, 2017 in the New York Times.

Warren Buffet, a man commonly referred to as one of the world’s most successful investors but how did he get this title? Quick and decisive decision making. He goes in while the confidence is low in a company and desperate for money. He then invests in the company to keep them afloat but with a very steep cost.

A Canadian mortgage lender, Home Capital Group, has hit rough times. They are one of the top lenders in Canada for borrowers with poor credit history and who are self-employed. This company was consistently making high yield loans attracting numerous investors. However, rumors almost closed the company.  Ontario Securities Commission accused the executives that they were withholding information from investors because apparently there was an inquiry about fraudulent information in the loans.

This sent investors running and shares in the company dropped a significant 33 percent. As money was flying …

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What about small radical housing plans?

In speaking with several people within industry I have come across the same idea a few time, to the extent that the thought has occupied my mind and turned into this article.

The idea is that experimentation is part of progress, but that we rarely experiment with housing, in particular we rarely experiment with the ‘how’ of  it. Historically it has taken calamitous events to make changes, for instance, the timber and plaster construction of Tudor homes was replaced by the brick and stone of Georgian construction only after large fires and events like the Great Gunpowder Disaster of 1597 in Dublin.

So what if we did the following: take a single street in Dublin, Cork and Galway, ideally one which is fairly ruined (there are many) and we said that for this one street that people could do whatever they wanted in terms of building anything they felt was appropriate or what they wanted to do.

That might mean you have a four storey house next to some shipping container apartments or some other weird mix, but we could …

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Rents continue to increase over the year by substantial amount

In reference to Irish private sector rents grew by 7.37% from 1st quarter 2016 to 1st quarter 2017 by Robert McHugh on 15 June 2017 in Business World.

Over the course of only a year, the average rent increased by 7.37% from 1st quarter 2016 to 1st quarter 2017. The standardised average national rent being €987, Dublin is one of the highest amongst the other counties as well as Cork and Galway. Looking over the houses and apartments market the trend of rents are continuing to grow.

Outside the Dublin county, the houses and apartment rents at a overall growth rate of 1.3% in private sector rents. Annual growth increased by 7.6% in houses and apartments. The margin is shrinking between the peak of 2007 and the 2017 first quarter however, it is still 8% below.

So far the 19 Rent Pressure Zones (RBZ) are located in parts of the following counties: Dublin, Cork, Galway, Meath. No other parts of the country are currently able to become Rent Pressure Zones, according the to latest Rent Index.

Mr. Simon Coveney, …

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Warnings on Capital Gain Tax Exemptions

Recent emails obtained under Freedom of Information by Pearse Doherty, Sinn Fein’s Finance spokesman, revealed concerns the Revenue Commission has regarding the Department of Finance’s capital gain tax exemptions introduced in last year’s bill.

 

Revenue has warned the Department of finance that it’s tax exemption measures could cause property fund to hoard and sit on its properties instead of selling them, restricting supply and causing difficulties in the housing market.

 

The five year capital gains tax exemption applied to funds that invest in property for capital gain. It was implemented to encourage these funds to purchase and develop more land to boost housing supply in the market. The tax exemption allows the funds to be avoid any tax charged on the profit made when selling an asset during a five year period.

 

The problem is that due to the tax exemption, property funds are less likely to sell their assets before the five year term ends even through there is a …

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Help-to-buy incentive under scrutiny

This past Sunday, current Housing Minister Eoghan Murphy said on RTE’s The Week in Politics that the Help-to-Buy initiative introduced by his predecessor is currently under review. Since its introduction in January under former Finance Minister Michael Noonan and former Housing Minister Simon Coveney, the Help-to-Buy initiative has already received nearly 7,000 applicants and has successfully helped a great percentage of them with the purchase or building of their first home. However, the initiative has recently come under fire for exacerbating the problems it intended to solve, and there is speculation that it may be dissolved.

 

The purpose of the Help-to-Buy incentive was to encourage first buyers to enter the market by helping applicants with their deposit through the refund of applicants’ income tax and DIRT other the past 4 years. It applies to first time buyers who either purchase or build new residential properties, and allows them to receive 5% of the purchase price of their new home, with an upward limit of €20,000. It is hoped that the incentive would help more people climb the property ladder, …

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ESRI is saying there is no housing bubble

With reference to ESRI says rapid rise in house prices does not signal new bubble by Eoin Burke-Kennedy 22 June 2017 in the Irish Times.

The Economic and Social Research Institute, ESRI, is stating that even though the housing prices and rents are rising rapidly this does not necessarily mean a new housing bubble. The official house construction may be overestimating the housing activity, according to the ESRI.

ESRI’s latest economic commentary included a section saying that even though new credit is growing in the residential market and small companies, a good credit risk assessment is still in place and seems to provide no risk.

ESRI still believes the housing prices and rent will be rising from the growing imbalance between supply and demand. The predicted the long-run housing demand to increase from 25,000 to 30,000-35,000.

The government supposedly overestimated the level of supply which may have overstated the true level of construction activity. Government estimating the housing supply at 15,000 in 2016 and ESRI at 12,700.

There is a lot of speculations of another housing bubble coming about. …

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Should we enforce more regulations for the housing market?

In reference to Michael O’Flynn backs tax on those hoarding development land by

Ciarán Hancock on June 21, 2017 in the Irish Times.

Michael O’Flynn, a property developer, gives support to a tax to those who are hoarding land and waiting until the housing prices increase. This tax has to be carefully composed in order to avoid taxing those who can’t build because of issues surrounding planning, lack of infrastructure, or zoning. This would be difficult to police and enforce due to fraud or proof of these issues.

O’Flynn also suggested the government to create a government separate entity to help coordinate the planning and zoning issues as well as manage infrastructure spending. This is so the two processes can better work together and help combat the housing issue.

If the government will reduce the VAT 4.5% from 13.5% to 9%, Michael O’Flynn …

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The mortgage market for returning expats

The government has pushed hard in recent years to bring professional workers back into Ireland, welcoming plenty of new construction and dozens of foreign tech companies into the docklands. With many talented workers finding jobs elsewhere in the EU and in countries such as USA and Australia in the aftermath of the financial crisis, it is essential to Ireland’s future as a highly advanced and modern nation that its own professional workforce be well employed at home. Well government initiatives have already seen great success, many returning expats are faced with various complications when attempting to bring their families back home. Amongst these complications is the difficult process these Irish citizens have to go through to get mortgages.

 

Expats currently working and paying tax in another country are considered non-residents. Thus in the books of most major lenders, they are segregated from all other Irish citizens and placed into similar categories as foreign nationals. Thus, returning expats face stricter limits on income and on Loan to Value ratios when apply for …

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Analyzing rental yields – what this means for investors and renters

An article was published by Fiona Reddan on the Irish Times early this morning examining and evaluating property investment options in and around Dublin today. The article uses the measure of rental yields, how much rental income a property generates as a percentage of its market value, to compare the worthiness of investment options.

 

The major finding in the article was a negative correlation between housing prices and rental yields, meaning that, in Ireland, higher priced properties generate lower investment yields on average. The worst places to invest includes areas such as Dublin 6, Dublin 4, and Dublin 14, where average sale prices are well above €500,000. The best places to invest includes Dublin 10 and Dublin 2, where the average market value of property is much lower. In Dublin 6 for example, the average sale price is €706,741, while rental yields are only 3.6%. On the other hand, in Dublin 10, the average sale price is €173,478, but the annual rental yield is 10.4%.

 

These …

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