Rents continue to increase over the year by substantial amount

In reference to Irish private sector rents grew by 7.37% from 1st quarter 2016 to 1st quarter 2017 by Robert McHugh on 15 June 2017 in Business World.

Over the course of only a year, the average rent increased by 7.37% from 1st quarter 2016 to 1st quarter 2017. The standardised average national rent being €987, Dublin is one of the highest amongst the other counties as well as Cork and Galway. Looking over the houses and apartments market the trend of rents are continuing to grow.

Outside the Dublin county, the houses and apartment rents at a overall growth rate of 1.3% in private sector rents. Annual growth increased by 7.6% in houses and apartments. The margin is shrinking between the peak of 2007 and the 2017 first quarter however, it is still 8% below.

So far the 19 Rent Pressure Zones (RBZ) are located in parts of the following counties: Dublin, Cork, Galway, Meath. No other parts of the country are currently able to become Rent Pressure Zones, according the to latest Rent Index.

Mr. Simon Coveney, …

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ESRI is saying there is no housing bubble

With reference to ESRI says rapid rise in house prices does not signal new bubble by Eoin Burke-Kennedy 22 June 2017 in the Irish Times.

The Economic and Social Research Institute, ESRI, is stating that even though the housing prices and rents are rising rapidly this does not necessarily mean a new housing bubble. The official house construction may be overestimating the housing activity, according to the ESRI.

ESRI’s latest economic commentary included a section saying that even though new credit is growing in the residential market and small companies, a good credit risk assessment is still in place and seems to provide no risk.

ESRI still believes the housing prices and rent will be rising from the growing imbalance between supply and demand. The predicted the long-run housing demand to increase from 25,000 to 30,000-35,000.

The government supposedly overestimated the level of supply which may have overstated the true level of construction activity. Government estimating the housing supply at 15,000 in 2016 and ESRI at 12,700.

There is a lot of speculations of another housing bubble coming about. …

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Should we enforce more regulations for the housing market?

In reference to Michael O’Flynn backs tax on those hoarding development land by

Ciarán Hancock on June 21, 2017 in the Irish Times.

Michael O’Flynn, a property developer, gives support to a tax to those who are hoarding land and waiting until the housing prices increase. This tax has to be carefully composed in order to avoid taxing those who can’t build because of issues surrounding planning, lack of infrastructure, or zoning. This would be difficult to police and enforce due to fraud or proof of these issues.

O’Flynn also suggested the government to create a government separate entity to help coordinate the planning and zoning issues as well as manage infrastructure spending. This is so the two processes can better work together and help combat the housing issue.

If the government will reduce the VAT 4.5% from 13.5% to 9%, Michael O’Flynn …

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An Upscale Dorm for Adults

With reference to Co-living goes mainstream, but this is not roommate roulette by Diana Olick

A new housing trend called ‘co-living’ is an upgraded version of low cost living geared for young professionals. The concept of co-living works like a college dorm, complete strangers living in an apartment together with shared living spaces. The catch is every roommate has to sign their own lease so there is liability for their roommates.

The idea came from an increase of housing costs in Chicago and there was no place for two guys, Ryan Shear and Noah Gottlieb, to live so they created this new style targeted for the young professional. It gives another option for people moving to a new city who don’t want the liability of sharing a lease with a stranger but wants to meet new people. It comes with a bedroom and bathroom to yourself and a shared-furnished common area. There is also cleaning services that come and clean the common area.

Gottlieb found the demand to be stronger than expected in Chicago with average age of renters …

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The Specified Serious Illness Cover is Expanding to Better Cover

In reference to The Story of Specified Serious Illness Cover by Colette Houton.

Health insurance coverage is expanding its benefits to better cover individuals. This is to better adapt to the changing medical world. New policies you can look forward to is partial coverage for early-diagnosed cancer, expanding the amount of diseases covered, coverage for children from birth, and organ donor coverage.

The medical world is constantly improving with new technology and software to keep up with the new medical discoveries. The health insurance industry has to keep up with these changes. They recently have made some strides to better cover their clients. They did this because they know how relieving it is for a client when they know their disease is covered.

A new stride has been partial coverage for early detected cancer. Since new medical technology, cancer is diagnosed far earlier than when a client is entitled to the full claim. Even when it is discovered earlier many times people still have to go through extensive surgery and medical tests.  To help, the insurance industry, specifically Royal London’s …

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Tensions are High in the Mortgage Market

This post is in reference to It’s time to shout ‘stop’ on excessive charges by Brendan Burgess and Banks warned over cashback mortgage deals by Donal O’Donovan. Both published on June 16 2017 in the Independent.

Interest rates are high for non-tracker mortgages and banks are offering cashback deals to manipulate customers.

Everyone is accusing everyone today in the mortgage market in Ireland with interest rates the highest in the European Union. The Competition and Consumer Protections Commission (CCPC) have sat idly by for the past years as the interest rates are rising when the CCPC is designed and paid by the taxpayer to protect the consumers. CCPC came out with a report yesterday stating Ireland needs more competition, long-term strategy, vision and more committees. No suggestions in the report have a solution for the short-term.

The Government, Central Bank, and the CCPC wants everyone to be patient and the competition with drive down mortgage rate… but how long from now? Government and the Central Bank have been saying this for the past three years and nothing has changed.

Now …

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Karl Deeter Mentioned in the Press

You can find an article at this link which mentions Karl Deeter, apart of Irish Mortgage Brokers – Bank accused of ‘gouging’ loyal customers cuts its fixed rates on June 15 2017. Article by Charlie Weston in the Independent.

Permanent TSB, a state-rescued bank, has been increasingly cutting fixed rates in response to being accused of manipulating their clients. The bank has lowered it’s two-year fixed mortgages from 7.25% to 4.20% and three-year fixed mortgages from 8.75% to 4.20%. They have almost halved both of their fixed rate mortgages but the variable rate at the bank has remained the same.

The Central Bank has noticed an increase of fixed variable rates compared to variable for both new borrowers and existing ones. Therefore, banks have been reducing fixed rates to increase competition amongst other banks. This will prevent clients to switching to other banks for better deals.

The bank also extended a 2% cashback on all new mortgage drawdowns, supposed to end this month but got extended to the end of the year.

Karl Deeter was mentioned accusing the bank …

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Housing Prices are to Remain High in the Future

With reference to Housing Costs likely to remain elevated in Medium Term by Ali Uğur.

The housing costs look to remain elevated with no promise of decreasing throughout the rest of 2017. With increases in the average price of property at 10.7% from 2016 to February 2017 according to the CSO residential property price index.

Concerning rental properties, the rental inflation is 13.4% for the first quarter of 2017. This being the second highest level since 2002. This is in part from the supply and demand issue here in Ireland for rental property. The May 1st, 2017 there was fewer than 3,100 rental properties available to rent. This is the lowest on the record, according to the Daft.ie report.

Looking on the bright side, we are seeing an 18% yearly increase in completed residential properties with 14,932 completed in 2016. This is in response to trying to meet the increase of demand in the housing market. A majority of these, however, are one-time builds and can’t predict any yearly continuous builds. The breaking of grounds for new residential homes has …

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ECB Putting Pressure on Irish Banks?

European Central Bank is putting pressure on Ireland’s main banks to deal with the non-performing mortgages on their books. The banks are coming up with ways to remove these non-performing loans off their balance sheets. Considering the possibility of special purpose vehicles (SPV) that package all of the non-performing loans. They will need to sell the majority of the stake of the SPV to investors for them to remove it from their books. By creating SPVs, banks will still be able to service and have a stake in the mortgages. They are starting to create leads on investors currently.

With the ECB already overseeing a lot of the main banks in Ireland in the end of 2014, they have cut their average of 27% of non-performing loans off their balance sheet in 2013 to 14% at the end of 2016.

In the recent years, US private equity firms have refinanced millions of non-performing loans from Irish lenders. Showing a demand for such bonds because of the great success of residential mortgage backed securitisation. The banks will need to structure any …

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How Do American Mortgages Work? Part 10: How does Western European Mortgages Compare

Relating this series to the Western European mortgage market, as fixed-rate mortgages are most common among America while variable-rate mortgages are the most common in Western Europe. This is because Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac insure their mortgages. This means it does not affect the lenders if the interest rate rises on a fixed-rate mortgage. It is so, because the mortgage market in the United States relies more on the secondary mortgage market than on formal government guarantees. Comparing home ownership rates between the United States and Western Europe, they are fairly similar but higher default rate in the United States. Mortgage loans are mostly non-recourse debt where the borrower is not personally liable in the United States.

With Ireland’s typical interest rate being higher compared to other Western European countries, theorist claim it was from the popularity of Tracker mortgages. Tracker mortgages being locked in at 1% higher than the European Central Bank (ECB) Rate, when the ECB rate hit 0% lenders were contractually obligated to have the borrowers’ interest rate at 1%. Since the lenders need to make …

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