The Housing Markets most Pressing Issue

Ireland’s “most pressing issue”…

The lack of housing.

Economist Philip O’Sullivan is reported as saying that tens of thousands more houses need to be completed annually to meet current demand. Why is it that there’s such a shortage of homes?

It is on schedule right now that 21,500 homes were built this year and 24,000 for next year. Though, a good number in the race to meet demand needs, it is nothing near the needed 30-50,000 homes being built to sufficiently meet the demand.

The society of chartered survey of Ireland has predicted that this housing crisis could continue for another 10 years. Paul O’donoghue, a writer for Fora sad that drastic measures need to be taken immediately to push for the development of homes.

With too little of homes available to meet demand, it is the law of supply and demand that says the price of the homes will increase as well. Equilibrium is expected to be reached by 2026.

This, falling in line with the prediction of the housing crisis to continue for nearly …

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The Solution to the U.S Down Payment Dilemma

Those looking to buy a home in the States are all currently saying the same thing is holding them back….They can’t seem to afford the down payment.

Down payments on houses can be burdensome and oftentimes weigh on the ability to buy a home. In some cases, it calls for years of disciplined saving. Something that can be difficult for someone who wants a home and wants it now.

That’s where the start-up company Loftium comes in with a solution. This is a business started by 29-year-old Yifan Zhang of Seattle.

As someone who has personally heard her friends talk for years about the down payment dilemma, she finally decided to do something about it.

Zhang started as any other Airbnb business owner. Renting out one room in her townhouse to generate extra cash. Little did she know just how much cash she could actually generate.

Quickly into her business, she was earning enough to completely pay for her mortgage and then have some left over!

That’s when the idea dawned.

Zhang decided to eliminate …

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Why the American Housing Market is Crashing

With housing being the most affordable it has been since the mid-1970’s, why are Americans choosing to rent instead of buy?

Many good things are to come by investing property, one of the best ones being the extremely high returns that can be received.

With mortgage rates at an all-time low, many areas with generally inexpensive rental properties are still proving to be more costly to live in, relative to the alternative of buying into the housing market.

The National Association of Realtors is even expecting rent costs to increase up to 5% over the upcoming years, giving any person a difficult purpose to justify renting over buying.

Caitlin McCabe suggests that part of the hardship is a “housing hangover” that was caused by the market crash of ’08. Many American homeowners are still experiencing a considerable loss while they have more to pay on their mortgages then what their home is even worth.

McCabe also did a study in which she found that less than one-third of those that lost their homes due to foreclosure plan to return to …

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Newstalk Lunchtime: Ciara Kelly talks to Karl Deeter about AirBnB and the housing market

We were part of a conversation with Ciara Kelly on Newstalk’s ‘Lunchtime’ show discussing AirBnB and whether or not you can blame it for housing sector problems in Ireland. Our view is that it is part of a healthy market, but where a market is unhealthy you can’t say that it is the source of the disease, rather the malaise in Irish housing generally.

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RTE: Sean O’Rourke Show, hard to help the homeless 8th May 2018

We were asked to speak on the Sean O’Rourke show about one landlords experience and how the experience left them feeling very negative towards the local authority.

We would believe that in order to remedy our housing crisis, in particular the homelessness element of it, that state power must to work as positively as possible with all of those who are involved including landlords. Serving a notice of a €5,000 fine and threats of prison for minor infractions is not part of how that comes about.

Dublin City Council have turned the landlord in question diametrically against helping more people in homelessness in the future. If this pattern of behaviour is repeated again and again across the city it is no wonder that helping people out of homelessness has become such a slow process.

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Newstalk: Should the public sector work fewer hours? Pat Kenny show

Karl Deeter and Brendan Harbor of the Forsa Union discussed whether or not the state should agree to have the members of Forsa work fewer hours per week and maintain the same pay. Karl strongly disagreed making the case that if things like the health service are not working well now that you can’t expect them to maintain current levels or improve if everybody is working fewer hours, such an assumption is simply illogica.

The full clip of the segment is below.

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RTE: So a fund bought your mortgage, what’s next?

Aengus Cox in RTE did a piece on funds who buy loan and there are sound clips and a written report on it here.

We made the point that “quite often do deals that the banks won’t do and that’s the frustrating thing – there’s massive write-down being done by these funds, and to me that’s a very positive development. They’re putting an end date – an end point – in situations that the banks have not had the courage or capacity to do. And sometimes finalising something is actually part of the solution. Now it might not end the way the person wants but this is an adult world where outcomes are based on decisions and consequences, not on what you want.”

The piece does a very good and fair job of looking at all sides of the argument, those of debt advocates, the funds themselves and market participants.

 

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Regulating mortage buyers is a political move not a sensible regulatory one.

Politicians are prone to playing politics, that’s a given. What is strange is that so few demonstrate a knowledge of the regulatory environment that banking exists in. While decrying a ‘lack of regulation’ they fail to see that loan sales are actually a result of regulation, the very thing they are saying they want.

If you have a long term agreement with a borrower that is a contract, it can and does stand the test of the courts. A fund buyer won’t seek to overturn that contract even though the loan is technically ‘not performing’.

This is an important point, if you got a split mortgage and it was agreed on a long term basis (as they are) then your loan is non-performing because part of the loan isn’t accruing interest. You are making payments in full on the other part, but it is less than the original contracted agreement. Any losses of interest are accounted for and already booked, but the loan itself is still going to be classified that way.

If somebody buys your loan they have to …

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